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Thread: "his brother's"

  1. #1
    Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    Default "his brother's"

    "his brother's"
    Isn't "his brother" without a possessive apostrophe correct?



    Nelson Mandela's grandson throws wife out of home after discovering that baby son is his brother's



    Source: Nelson Mandela's grandson throws wife out of home after discovering that baby son is his brother's - Telegraph

  2. #2
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    Default Re: "his brother's"

    No, he discovered that the child he thought was his baby son is in fact his brother's son.

    He thought he was the father of his wife's child. He was not. His own brother was the father.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: "his brother's"

    Without the apostrophe the meaning would change to something extremely unlikely.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: "his brother's"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Without the apostrophe the meaning would change to something extremely unlikely.
    Although not impossible.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: "his brother's"

    Sure. If his wife had an affair with his father, then the baby could be his brother. Kind of icky to think about, but there you are.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: "his brother's"

    Things can get complicated.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: "his brother's"

    I think we would be veering into an episode of Jeremy Kyle!
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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