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  1. keannu's Avatar
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      • Student or Learner
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    #1

    there is vs there are

    In colloquialism, we can hear there's a lot even for plural nouns, so I even heard this can be settled as formal grammar. In strict grammar, 1 might be wrong, but we can't deny 1 is as common as 2.
    So can we accept 1 as a formal one?

    1.There is a lot of reasons why Charlie(Keannu's English name) is trying to study English so hard.
    2.There are a lot of reasons why Charlie is trying to study English so hard.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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      • Retired English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: there is vs there are

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    So can we accept 1 as a formal one?

    1.There is a lot of reasons why Charlie(Keannu's English name) is trying to study English so hard.
    2.There are a lot of reasons why Charlie is trying to study English so hard.
    No.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: there is vs there are

    In speech, you will hear a lot of people say "There's a lot of ..." but generally only using the contraction. Most of them would agree that "There is a lot of" sounds wrong but they don't seem to hear the same problem with "There's ..."
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
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    #4

    Re: there is vs there are

    You will hear people say There's two reasons why Charlie is trying to study English, but it would not be acceptable formally- it's colloquial and many would consider it wrong.

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