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Thread: knock up

  1. #1
    aarkaypee is offline Newbie
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    Post knock up

    What is the correct phrasal verb for preparing a meal quickly : "knock up a meal" or "knock over a meal".

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: knock up

    Neither of the above.

    'Rustle up' is one suggestion.

    Rover

  3. #3
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    Chicken Sandwich is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: knock up

    NOT A TEACHER

    "Knock something together" seems to work too.

    Taken from the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English:

    knock something ↔ together phrasal verb informal
    to make something quickly, using whatever you have available : We should be able to knock something together with what’s in the fridge (= make a meal from items of food in the fridge ) .


  4. #4
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    Default Re: knock up

    I sometimes knock up a quick meal.

  5. #5
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: knock up

    What is the correct phrasal verb for preparing a meal quickly : "knock up a meal" or "knock over a meal".

    I agree with Rover that "rustle up" is the first possibility that occurs to me, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear "knock up a meal", it does occur but is very informal.
    I think ChickenS's "knock together" is also possible although I would probably expect to hear "throw together" more often, even though it sounds messy.

    To "knock over a meal" would normally mean to eat it, probably quite casually and quickly.

    not a teacher

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: knock up

    I think knock up a meal is fine, and rustle up/knock together.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: knock up

    Not in the US. "Knock up" means to impregnate and the other meaning is not used here.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  8. #8
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: knock up

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Not in the US. "Knock up" means to impregnate and the other meaning is not used here.
    We have that meaning too in BrE.

  9. #9
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: knock up

    ... and other meanings, of course - often involving door-knockers.

    b

  10. #10
    Cory Sampson is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: knock up

    That reminds me of an anecdote my uncle used to tell about a friend of his who had to return something he had borrowed from a Scottish friend of his. Knowing that the Scottish friend would be at work, my uncle's friend asked how he'd be able to return it. The Scotsman replied, "just stop by my house and knock up my wife."

    My uncle's friend was greatly disturbed at the prospect.



    Anyway, in response to the original question, I have usually heard "knock up [a meal]" in reference to something impromptu, like a soup, stew or chili. To me (Canadian English speaker) it would sound odd to "knock up some steak", or to "knock up some roast beef"; however, "knock up a beef stew" seems perfectly cogent.
    Last edited by Cory Sampson; 29-Aug-2012 at 17:33. Reason: To contribute to the original question

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