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Thread: butter in mouth

  1. #11
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: butter in mouth

    Quote Originally Posted by ebb
    the South, but it's the same all over. Interesting... makes for some fun miscommunication.

    Here's an apocryphal one about US President Calvin Coolidge -- known as "Silent Cal" -- he may have been a candidate for the non-melting-mouth.

    Lady at Party: "Oh, Mr President, you're so gracious, and my friend bet me that I couldn't get you to say three words to me !!"
    Cal: "You lose."
    I heard that when his wife was ill he went to church alone and came back and told her the sermon was about sin. When asked what the vicar had said, he replied, 'He's against it.'


  2. #12
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: butter in mouth

    Quote Originally Posted by Johan[@CLT]
    Hi peeps,

    The UK and US meaning are each others contrast. I'm very fond of using and learning new expressions, so what is the correct meaning of this saying ?
    It would appear that the idiom changes as it moves across the Atlantic, so use it differently according to the nationality of your audience.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: butter in mouth

    Good point you make there tdol

    Will already try to remember the British one

    Kind Regards

  4. #14
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    Talking Re: butter in mouth

    Oh, well, in that case, you should know the Americans are always right and we have the missiles to prove it. ..

    ok I confess, that was tdol's benefit. He's getting a good chuckle from it right now as he reads this....

    Seriously ... it depends on where you are, and on your audience, doesn't it? They (our British pals, errr, I mean chums) after all say "lorry" for "truck" whereas in the US "Lorry" just sounds like a girl's name.

    Boot in UK (of a car) = trunk (of a car) in the USA. To us, a "boot" is a kind of shoe you wear on your foot.

    Bonnet in UK (of a car) = hood (of a car) in the USA. To us, a bonnet is a girls' hat.

    It's easy to find I'm sure on the Net a list of these translations. We are two people separated by a common language.

  5. #15
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    Talking Re: butter in mouth

    tdol wrote about Cal Coolidge: I heard that when his wife was ill he went to church alone and came back and told her the sermon was about sin. When asked what the vicar had said, he replied, 'He's against it.'

    Reminding me of a Woody Allen joke: "I just took Evelyn Wood speed reading. I finished War and Peace in one day. It's about Russia."

  6. #16
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    Default Re: butter in mouth

    HEhe That's what I call tongue in cheek

    Indeed, the two languages may differ from time to time. And when I started learning English I prefered US english above UK english, but that has changed quite seriously Sorry, mate I don't want to offend you here. But my point of view is that British English is more colourful. It took my some time to get used to it though.
    Anyway, I don't want to start a discussion here I really have to thank you guys (Americans in general) for supplying us with so many English songs and movies, thanks to those I have already learnt a lot.

    Ebb ... take care dude

    Kind regards

  7. #17
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    Default Re: butter in mouth

    melt: to make or become emotional or sentimental; soften: she melted into tears. (Old English (meltan) to digest. Therefor a person who does not become emotional or dislikes showing any form of emotionality. Is this a possibility...by the way tdol Im English too

  8. #18
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    Default Re: butter in mouth

    Two different languages indeed, in Michigan I once asked if it were OK to take of my jumper...All the girls in the office nearly died laughing...I didn`t understand until I was told that a jumper is a knitted dress in Detroit

  9. #19
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: butter in mouth

    Quote Originally Posted by ebb
    Oh, well, in that case, you should know the Brits are always right
    I couldn't agree with you more.
    Last edited by Tdol; 17-Jan-2006 at 06:30.

  10. #20
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: butter in mouth

    Quote Originally Posted by woodhouse
    melt: to make or become emotional or sentimental; soften: she melted into tears. (Old English (meltan) to digest. Therefor a person who does not become emotional or dislikes showing any form of emotionality. Is this a possibility...by the way tdol Im English too
    It's definitely a possibility. What would you mean with the idiom- coldness or innocence or both acording to context?

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