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  1. #1
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default what's the opposite of "wear off" in this kind of sentence?

    1) The wounded soldier was in great pain after the morphine wore off.
    2) I guess the effect of the anaesthetic is going to wear off.
    3) When I met John I fell for him immediately, but now it's been wearing off.

    What's the opposite verb of "wear off" in these sentences where the verb means something like "to dimish"? Is there a particular phrasal verb to use or can the verb "to grow" be correct?

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: what's the opposite of "wear off" in this kind of sentence?

    An anaesthetic takes effect before it wears off.

    In #3 there is nothing which can be said to be wearing off.

    Feelings can grow (stronger), as you surmised.

    Note spelling of diminish.

    Rover

  3. #3
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: what's the opposite of "wear off" in this kind of sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    1) The wounded soldier was in great pain after the morphine wore off.
    The wounded soldier was in great pain until the morphine kicked in.

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: what's the opposite of "wear off" in this kind of sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The wounded soldier was in great pain until the morphine kicked in.
    That's a great informal expression.

    Rover

  5. #5
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    Default Re: what's the opposite of "wear off" in this kind of sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    That's a great informal expression.

    Rover
    Yes, it's more colloquial than "wear off", and couldn't be used in all situations as an antonym for "wear off".

  6. #6
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    Default Re: what's the opposite of "wear off" in this kind of sentence?

    With regard to pain, you can say that a pain "came on" slowly, suddenly, over a couple of days etc.

    As far as the anaesthetic is concerned, I would go with the colloquial "it's starting to kick in" first, then "it's starting to take effect".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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