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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    'To transgress your remit'?

    Hi,
    Does 'transgressing one's remit' mean the same as 'crossin the red line'?
    (If yes, could you please give me any other commonly used expression?)





    Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: 'To transgress your remit'?

    Does 'transgressing one's remit' mean the same as 'crossing the red line'?
    I don't know.

    In what context did you encounter this phrase?

    Rover
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 01-Sep-2012 at 13:48.

  2. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'To transgress your remit'?

    Sorry for not giving you the context. I thought it was a fixed expression. It's from 'My Family', season 5, episode 7. The housewife is jealous of the new cleaner, who's doing her job well, and begins to worry about the situation. And this is part of a sentence she said about the cleaner.

  3. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 'To transgress your remit'?

    NOT A TEACHER

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    I thought it was a fixed expression.
    No, I'm pretty sure that this isn't a fixed (idiomatic) phrase. Given the context, I would say that the housewife is saying that the cleaner is doing more work than she has been (officialy) asked to do. In other words, the cleaner goes above and beyond the call of duty.

    See the following entries, remit - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online and transgress - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 01-Sep-2012 at 14:46.

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