Results 1 to 6 of 6
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 769
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    to take something apart

    what's the opposite of to take something apart in sentences like this?

    - I had to take my bike apart to put it in the boot.
    - Dad had to take the swing set apart before moving to London.

    Are "to set up" and "to put together" the opposites of "to take apart"?
    Do they mean the same in this context? Can they be used without any particular difference in meaning in sentences like the ones above?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 23,497
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: to take something apart

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    what's the opposite of to take something apart in sentences like this?

    - I had to take my bike apart to put it in the boot.
    - Dad had to take the swing set apart before moving to London.

    Are "to set up" and "to put together" the opposites of "to take apart"?
    Do they mean the same in this context? Can they be used without any particular difference in meaning in sentences like the ones above?
    No, the opposite of "take apart" is "put together". The opposite of "set up" in the sense you are using it, is "take down".

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 769
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: to take something apart

    ok , so, could we say that I can set up a bookshelf, a picture on the wall, or the Christmas tree?
    Because, up to now I've always considered "to put up" or "to stick up" as opposite of "to take down"...

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: to take something apart

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    ok , so, could we say that I can set up a bookshelf, a picture on the wall, or the Christmas tree?
    Because, up to now I've always considered "to put up" or "to stick up" as opposite of "to take down"...
    The opposite of 'take down' in the sense that you are using it, is 'put up', as you thought.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 769
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: to take something apart

    so, to put up or to set up in these sentences are both good.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: to take something apart

    I'd use 'set up' only for the Christmas tree, not the shelf or the picture.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •