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    #1

    soap (countable and uncountable noun)

    Soap can be a countable or uncountable noun.

    1. There isn't any soap in the bathroom.
    2. There aren't any soaps in the bathroom.

    I wonder if sentence 2 is natural.

    Thanks.

  1. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: soap (countable and uncountable noun)

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Soap can be a countable or uncountable noun.

    1. There isn't any soap in the bathroom.
    2. There aren't any soaps in the bathroom.

    I wonder if sentence 2 is natural. I'd say it isn't.

    Thanks.
    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  2. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: soap (countable and uncountable noun)

    NOT A TEACHER

    I agree with charliedeut. Longman says that "soap", meaning detergent (not the television "soap" which is countable) can be countable and uncountable, but I can't think of a context in which you'd use the plural form. I'd be interested to hear what others think of this.

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    #4

    Re: soap (countable and uncountable noun)

    I saw some hotel put a bar of soap in the bathroom. In this case, can we say 'There aren't any soaps in the bathroom'?

    Thanks.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: soap (countable and uncountable noun)

    I would still say "There isn't any soap."

    Sometimes you get these little decorative soaps, shaped like sea shells or flowers something, and you put them in a dish for when company comes. Then you could say "What cute little soaps you have in the bathroom!" but when you simply need the product for the pupose of washing your hands, it's just "soap."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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