Hello everybody,


I have some issues with the present perfect continuous when it means : Actions recently finished, and without time phrase.
I don't know which should I use : present perfect simple, present perfect continuous and even the past continuous at times!

Here are some examples :


First example
- 'What have you been doing today?'
- 'I've been reading a book'
or
- 'I've just been reading a book'


But... I don't see any difference (I'm French) and I wonder why they say : 'what have you been doing today' instead of 'what have you done' ...



And in a video, I saw :
"I have been looking over your resume and I have to say I'm very impressed."

Context : That's for a job interview, the job applicant knock at the door and the head of personnel is waiting for her with the resume in her hand. And she say :
'Oh come in, have a seat. I have been looking over your resume and I have to say I'm very impressed'.

I'm wondering whether I can use the present perfect and what's the difference between :

->I have been looking over your resume and I have to say I'm very impressed.

-> I have (just) looked over your resume and I have to say I'm very impressed.

What is the difference? Does it imply an idea (PPC) of duration? (PPS) Of completion? :s


Third example
-Who have you talked to?

-Who have you been talking to?

-Who were you talking to?
<-- I believe this one is more common in American English, because I saw it in Malcolm ;)

I'm totally lost with those ones... I can't imagine what the difference they have.


Fourth example
-The ground is wet. It has been raining.

-The ground is wet. It has rained.

The former is more common than the latter, but I have already seen the latter... So... I odn't know :/


And finally :
- Why have you been talking to him?

- Why have you talked to him?

- Why were you talking to him?


I'm sorry for this long post, but I think : the more examples there are, the better you can help me ^_^

I hope you'll can help me to see the difference

Thank you very much in advance,

Have good night / have a nice day.

Arobaz