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  1. sky3120's Avatar
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    #1

    Let me know when she comes in.

    1) Let me know when she comes in.

    2) Let me know, when she comes in.

    Can I say the sentences and "when clause" can be an adverbial clause and an object like above? And there must

    be some difference between them in meaning. Or only #1 is grammatically correct? What do you think? Thank you

    as usual and have a good day.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • Retired English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: Let me know when she comes in.

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post
    1) Let me know when she comes in.

    2) Let me know, when she comes in.

    Can I say the sentences and "when clause" can be an adverbial clause and an object like above? And there must

    be some difference between them in meaning. Or only #1 is grammatically correct? What do you think? Thank you

    as usual and have a good day.
    Only #1 is natural.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Let me know when she comes in.

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post
    1) Let me know when she comes in.

    2) Let me know, when she comes in.

    Can I say the sentences and "when clause" can be an adverbial clause and an object like above? And there must

    be some difference between them in meaning. Or only #1 is grammatically correct? What do you think? Thank you

    as usual and have a good day.
    For 2, you can write "When she comes in, let me know."
    1 can be ambiguous. "Let me know as soon as she comes in", or "Let me know sometime what time she comes in."
    Actually 2 can be ambiguous as well. The context will tell.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 17,563
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    #4

    Re: Let me know when she comes in.

    I hadn't realized the potential ambiguity of the sentence until Ray pointed it out.

    Mary has been late to work every day this week. I bet she'll be late today.
    Okay - let me me know when (= what time) she comes in.

    I forgot to ask Mary yesterday about whether she'll be joining us for lunch, but she'll be here any moment and I'll ask her again.
    Okay - let me know (whether she will be joining us) when she comes in (because then you'll be able to ask her.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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