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  1. #1
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default The Two Ronnies, "Crossed Lines"

    I've just watched a sketch by The Two Ronnies entitled Crossed Lines. I understood annoyingly little of it. Could you please help me? The video is here.

    At 1:10, Corbett says, "Bloomers too large." What did he mean by that? I know bloomers are a kind of underwear and that makes it a joke, but he was talking about something else, right?

    At 3:05, he says, "I thought it said 'Oxo'." What does it have to do with a cross-your-heart bra? What does "the opportunity to have a quick butcher's" mean, and why is it funny? And again, what does it have to do with Oxo?

    What does a dog leaping into someone's lap have to do with apples?

    At 3:53, what's the joke about? I understand he's talking about apples when he says "Cox's Pippins". I think the joke is that it sounds like something else, but I'm not sure what. I can't come up with anything that sounds the same and makes sense. "Cox's" sounds like "cocks his", but that doesn't ring any bells. Is it a sex reference?

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The Two Ronnies, "Crossed Lines"

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I've just watched a sketch by The Two Ronnies entitled Crossed Lines. I understood annoyingly little of it. Could you please help me? The video is here.

    At 1:10, Corbett says, "Bloomers too large." What did he mean by that? I know bloomers are a kind of underwear and that makes it a joke, but he was talking about something else, right?
    Yes he was. He's going through a list of things he tried get at Sainsbury's (a department store).
    Bloomers (2, large). I'm not sure what this British idiom is. It could mean flowers - 2 large, blooming flowers.


    At 3:05, he says, "I thought it said 'Oxo'." What does it have to do with a cross-your-heart bra? What does "the opportunity to have a quick butcher's" mean, and why is it funny? And again, what does it have to do with Oxo?
    I believe "a butcher's" = "a butcher's hook" = "a look" in rhyming slang. The opporunity to have a quick look.
    OXO is meant to be a visual symbol for a cross-your-heart bra. I can explain further if necessary.


    What does a dog leaping into someone's lap have to do with apples?
    Not sure about this. I think it was just a transition setting up for a few more gags.

    At 3:53, what's the joke about? I understand he's talking about apples when he says "Cox's Pippins". I think the joke is that it sounds like something else, but I'm not sure what. I can't come up with anything that sounds the same and makes sense. "Cox's" sounds like "cocks his", but that doesn't ring any bells. Is it a sex reference?
    The dog jumps into your lap and cocks his pippins. This is the Two Ronnies. It's almost certainly a sex reference of some sort, but I'm not sure what "pippins" are (apart from apples). If you've got a weird enough mind, it probably doesn't matter.
    Hope that's helped a little.

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: The Two Ronnies, "Crossed Lines"

    Concise Oxford English Dictionary 2008 Oxford University Press:
    bloomer2
    nounBrit. a large loaf with diagonal slashes on a rounded top.
    There's a picture of one here, but you've to go to the bottom of page 13 to find it.

    Rover

  4. #4
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The Two Ronnies, "Crossed Lines"

    Thank you both. Now that I understand the Oxo joke, it's very well written, but I wouldn't have understood it ever without your help.

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The Two Ronnies, "Crossed Lines"

    I'm sure I wouldn't get the joke either. This is the only "Oxxo" I know:


  6. #6
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: The Two Ronnies, "Crossed Lines"

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I've just watched a sketch by The Two Ronnies entitled Crossed Lines. I understood annoyingly little of it. Could you please help me? The video is here.

    At 1:10, Corbett says, "Bloomers too large." What did he mean by that? I know bloomers are a kind of underwear and that makes it a joke, but he was talking about something else, right?

    At 3:05, he says, "I thought it said 'Oxo'." What does it have to do with a cross-your-heart bra? What does "the opportunity to have a quick butcher's" mean, and why is it funny? And again, what does it have to do with Oxo?

    What does a dog leaping into someone's lap have to do with apples?

    At 3:53, what's the joke about? I understand he's talking about apples when he says "Cox's Pippins". I think the joke is that it sounds like something else, but I'm not sure what. I can't come up with anything that sounds the same and makes sense. "Cox's" sounds like "cocks his", but that doesn't ring any bells. Is it a sex reference?
    The joke (not a rib-tickler, in my estimation) is that the two conversations are not related, so when RC says 'Bloomers, 2, large' (repeating a shopping list, and referring to a sort of loaf) we interpret it as 'Bloomers, too large'; it doesn't pay to follow the logic too closely (and ask 'Why does RB hear that?'). This was a sketch written for a prime-time Saturday evening slot, and RB's material typically relied on a joke-like form.

    Raymott has put you on the right track with 'OXO' and 'butcher's 'ook/look. You're right about the pun at 3.53 being on 'cocks his' - but the reference is not sexual. The action of a dog raising its hind leg to urinate is known as 'cocking its leg'. In fact, the phrase is so closely associated with urine that 'cocks his leg' (said) of a dog is a sort of euphemism. RB was well enough educated to know the French faire pipi, and I imagine - although the audience weren't expected to pick up this reference - that made him favour the phrase 'Cox's Pippins'.

    b

    PS ( Have you found the 'fork 'andles' sketch? That one is so famous and well-loved that at his funeral (last year, I think) RB's coffin was surrounded by four candles.)

  7. #7
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: The Two Ronnies, "Crossed Lines"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    The joke (not a rib-tickler, in my estimation) is that the two conversations are not related, so when RC says 'Bloomers, 2, large' (repeating a shopping list, and referring to a sort of loaf) we interpret it as 'Bloomers, too large'; it doesn't pay to follow the logic too closely (and ask 'Why does RB hear that?'). This was a sketch written for a prime-time Saturday evening slot, and RB's material typically relied on a joke-like form.

    Raymott has put you on the right track with 'OXO' and 'butcher's 'ook/look. You're right about the pun at 3.53 being on 'cocks his' - but the reference is not sexual. The action of a dog raising its hind leg to urinate is known as 'cocking its leg'. In fact, the phrase is so closely associated with urine that 'cocks his leg' (said) of a dog is a sort of euphemism. RB was well enough educated to know the French faire pipi, and I imagine - although the audience weren't expected to pick up this reference - that made him favour the phrase 'Cox's Pippins'.

    b

    PS ( Have you found the 'fork 'andles' sketch? That one is so famous and well-loved that at his funeral (last year, I think) RB's coffin was surrounded by four candles.)
    RB died in 2005. RC is, to the best of my knowledge, still with us.

  8. #8
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: The Two Ronnies, "Crossed Lines"

    More and more people seem to be doing it nowadays - it's hard to keep track. (You're right about RC.)

    b

  9. #9
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Two Ronnies, "Crossed Lines"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I'm sure I wouldn't get the joke either. This is the only "Oxxo" I know:

    These are the ones: http://www.rekoorsoftware.co.uk/sales/c00156.jpg They're for making soup/stock/gravy and I didn't write it 'giving a meal man-appeal'.

    b

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