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  1. #1
    itecompro is offline Newbie
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    Question Possession with 's and without 's

    Hi there,
    One simple question:

    How come we say "Alice's book" but "car door". Why don't we say "car's door"?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Possession with 's and without 's

    Quote Originally Posted by itecompro View Post
    Hi there,
    One simple question:

    How come we say "Alice's book" but "car door". Why don't we say "car's door"?

    Thanks in advance.
    If you put "car's door" into a sentence, I'll comment on it.

  3. #3
    itecompro is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Possession with 's and without 's

    I can't give an example because I don't know the rule and I don't remember whether I've seen "car's door" or not.
    The problem is that I don't know when we should use " 's " and when not. Could you please explain it with your own examples?

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Possession with 's and without 's

    The best way I can explain it is simply to say that the door doesn't literally "belong" to the car. A car is an inanimate object. It cannot own or possess anything, so nothing can belong to it.

    Alice's book is a book which literally belongs to Alice.
    The car door is simply a door which happens to be attached to a car. It is the door of a car, not a door which belongs to a car.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. #5
    Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    Chicken Sandwich is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Possession with 's and without 's

    Quote Originally Posted by itecompro View Post
    Hi there,
    One simple question:

    How come we say "Alice's book" but "car door". Why don't we say "car's door"?

    Thanks in advance.

    NOT A TEACHER


    I have found a thread that you may appreciate. According to the participants in this thread, both "car's door" and "car door" are possible, depending on the context.

  6. #6
    itecompro is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Possession with 's and without 's

    What about this context?

    [START]
    Compressed in the zip file, you’ll see the original course syllabuses which are downloaded from the universities’ official websites. Reference books are mentioned in each university’s “.pdf” file.
    [END]

    Could you please correct my mistakes and explain why you have done so?

  7. #7
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Possession with 's and without 's

    Quote Originally Posted by itecompro View Post
    What about this context?

    [START]
    Compressed in the zip file, you’ll see the original course syllabuses which are downloaded from the universities’ official websites. Reference books are mentioned in each university’s “.pdf” file.
    [END]

    Could you please correct my mistakes and explain why you have done so?
    It seems OK to me.

  8. #8
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Possession with 's and without 's

    I would just say pdf file- without the dot or the inverted commas.

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