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    #1

    Mutatis Mutandis

    I'm not sure if I'm using the expression "mutatis mutandis" correctly. I'm trying to say that only the year in the payment schedule below will change.

    "The amount of 500,000 will be paid in three installments as follows:
    - 35% before or on January 1, 2013;
    - 55% before or on March 1, 2013;
    - 10% on the completion of the Event.

    If the Agreement is renewed for the 2014 Event, the above payment schedule will apply mutatis mutandis [= January 1, 2014; March 1, 2014]."

    Correct?

    Thanks!

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Mutatis Mutandis

    Mutatis mutandis means 'when/after/if things that need changing have been changed'. So your usage is correct.

    b

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    #3

    Re: Mutatis Mutandis

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen165 View Post
    I'm not sure if I'm using the expression "mutatis mutandis" correctly. I'm trying to say that only the year in the payment schedule below will change.

    "The amount of 500,000 will be paid in three installments as follows:
    - 35% before or on January 1, 2013 (Usually written "on or before")
    - 55% before or on March 1, 2013;
    - 10% on the completion of the Event (No reason to capitalize "Event")

    If the Agreement is renewed for the 2014 Event, the above payment schedule will apply mutatis mutandis [= January 1, 2014; March 1, 2014]."

    Correct?

    Thanks!
    It's an interesting term, but, having been in business for many years, I have never seen it used.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Mutatis Mutandis

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    It's an interesting term, but, having been in business for many years, I have never seen it used.
    Maybe it's a British/American thing. Mutatis mutandis can usually be avoided, and if possible I would avoid it; also it's often used when it's not needed. But here it's OK.

    b

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Mutatis Mutandis

    I had never seen it or heard it before this thread.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Mutatis Mutandis

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I had never seen it or heard it before this thread.
    In fact, in Spanish it is (or rather, was) fairly commonly used. But I had never thought it would be used in English, either.

    PS: Nowadays, in Spanish, you'd be likely to find the expression just in literature or high-brow economic analysis. Unfortunaltely, it has virtually vanished from speech or plainer texts (newspapers et al.)
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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