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  1. #1
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Default the usage of "on the sidelines of"

    Dear teachers,
    I often hear in news reports on the radio or on TV or videos that "Mr. or Mrs or Miss What's-His-Or-Her-Name, a correspondent, is reporting from the sidelines of an international conference." I've consulted my physical dictionaries and also searched online for the meaning of "reporting from the sidelines of a conference", but I only get the meaning of "stay/stand on the sidelines" of "not taking part in an activity even though you want to or should do". But what is the exact meaning of "a correspondent reporting from the sidelines of a conference"?

    I also remember that in news reports I often hear "two political leaders hold bilateral talks on the sidelines of an international conference". Then, what is the accurate meaning of "holding bilateral talks on the sidelines of an international conference"? Is it that the talks held are not on the agenda of the international conference or have nothing to do with the international conference?
    Thanks a lot.
    Richard

  2. #2
    Gillnetter is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: the usage of "on the sidelines of"

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Dear teachers,
    I often hear in news reports on the radio or on TV or videos that "Mr. or Mrs or Miss What's-His-Or-Her-Name, a correspondent, is reporting from the sidelines of an international conference." I've consulted my physical dictionaries and also searched online for the meaning of "reporting from the sidelines of a conference", but I only get the meaning of "stay/stand on the sidelines" of "not taking part in an activity even though you want to or should do". But what is the exact meaning of "a correspondent reporting from the sidelines of a conference"?

    I also remember that in news reports I often hear "two political leaders hold bilateral talks on the sidelines of an international conference". Then, what is the accurate meaning of "holding bilateral talks on the sidelines of an international conference"? Is it that the talks held are not on the agenda of the international conference or have nothing to do with the international conference?
    Thanks a lot.
    Richard
    In American football there are lines drawn in chalk. These lines describe the playing area for the football players. The areas outside of the place where the playing takes place are called the sidelines - they are located to the side of the playing area. Imagine a rectangle. Anything inside the rectangle is the playing area, and anything outside is called the sideline area. Now, take this idea and apply it to a conference. If one is inside the playing area, this person is taking part in the conference. Anyone outside of this area only sees and hears part of the conference and can only report part of what actually happens in the conference.

  3. #3
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Default Re: the usage of "on the sidelines of"

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    In American football there are lines drawn in chalk. These lines describe the playing area for the football players. The areas outside of the place where the playing takes place are called the sidelines - they are located to the side of the playing area. Imagine a rectangle. Anything inside the rectangle is the playing area, and anything outside is called the sideline area. Now, take this idea and apply it to a conference. If one is inside the playing area, this person is taking part in the conference. Anyone outside of this area only sees and hears part of the conference and can only report part of what actually happens in the conference.
    Thanks, Gillnetter.
    I just have it confirmed. Am I right that "two political leaders holding bilateral talks on the sidelines of an international conference" means that "the bilateral talks have nothing to do with the international conference the two political leaders are attending"? Thanks.

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