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  1. #1
    wotcha's Avatar
    wotcha is offline Senior Member
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    Default Either of the restaurat is/are fine to me.

    1. Neither of the restaurants is my expensive.

    2. Neither of the restaurants are expensive.


    3. Either of the restaurants is fine.

    4. Either of the restaurants are fine.


    5. I was invited to two parties last week but I didn't go to either of them.



    1 and 2 are both grammatical and I wonder if sentence 4 is grammatical too.

    Also I want to know why 'both' can't be used in the sentence 5 instead of 'either'.




    Last edited by wotcha; 27-Sep-2012 at 05:52.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Either of the restaurat is/are fine to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by wotcha View Post
    1. Neither of the restaurants is my expensive.

    2. Neither of the restaurants are expensive.


    3. Either of the restaurants is fine.

    4. Either of the restaurants are fine.


    5. I was invited to two parties last week but I didn't go to either of them.



    1 and 2 are both grammatical and I wonder if sentence 4 is grammatical too.

    Also I want to know why 'both' can't be used in the sentence 5 instead of 'either'.



    You will hear 1, 2, 3 and 4. As far as 5 goes, you could use "both" but only if you went to one of the parties. If you went to neither, then you didn't go to either.

    To use "both", I would expect to hear something like "I was invited to two parties last week but I didn't go to both of them - I only went to the one that was a five-minute walk from my house". You are simply making it clear that you chose to go to one, but not both.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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