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  1. #1
    Marina Gaidar's Avatar
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    Default Smash in head/smash head

    I feel lost with the prepositions here. When something falls on one's head, can I say "it smashed him in the head" or it is better to say "it smashed his head"? I've chosen the word "smash" because it sounds powerful enough to create a sarcastical effect in my context.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Smash in head/smash head

    Quote Originally Posted by Marina Gaidar View Post
    I feel lost with the prepositions here. When something falls on one's head, can I say "it smashed him in the head" or it is better to say "it smashed his head"? I've chosen the word "smash" because it sounds powerful enough to create a sarcastical effect in my context.
    Maybe if you provided us with that context, we'd be able to help you better. IMO, as it stands, "smash" is not adequate unless it actaully cracked his head open. Maybe "it crashed on his head" would be a better choice. This, however, will depend on hte context.

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. #3
    Marina Gaidar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Smash in head/smash head

    Thanks a lot! I believe "crashed on" is that very thing I wanted!
    Last edited by Marina Gaidar; 28-Sep-2012 at 11:50.

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    Default Re: Smash in head/smash head

    Quote Originally Posted by Marina Gaidar View Post
    Thanks a lot! I believe "crashed on" is that very thing I wanted!
    I'm glad. It was sheer luck, though. It's a pity I didn't go buy a lottery ticket instead!
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Smash in head/smash head

    As has already been pointed out, context is important. There are several variations I can think of but they really would depend on what was involved! As you will see, different prepositions are involved each time.

    A tree was struck by lightning and crashed down on the man, smashing his head. (The tree crashed, but the effect on the man was that it severely damaged his head.)

    There was a huge fight outside the pub between a 22-year-old and a 45-year-old man. The older man is now in hospital after the 22-year-old smashed his head in. (Note "to smash someone's head in" is definitely an informal phrase, probably only used in BrE.)

    The burglar used a baseball bat to smash the homeowner around the head and face.

    The tree fell on his head.

    The tree crashed (down) on his head.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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