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    #1

    Uncountable nouns

    Dear teachers,

    Would you please tell me if the following sentences are correct? Please check the underlined elements and tell me if something else should be written instead.

    1) a) We could hear (a) some roars / b) bursts / c) a roar of laughter (d) coming from the corridor.

    2) Different jams were exposed on the market stalls.

    3) Several toothpastes were distributed to the children.

    4) a) Debris of glass b) was/were (?) scattered all over the floor.

    5) Millions of a) sheeps were killed on the day of the b) Ad El Kebir (spelling? = Muslim feast).

    6) These a) types (?) / b) patterns of behaviour are unacceptable in such an institution.

    7) I bought a lot of fruits in the market on Sunday.
    (Do we say “a piece of fruit”? When is ‘fruit’ countable and when is it not?)

    8) Two a) kits (?) / b) pieces of furniture will be delivered.

    9) Some a) cubes / b) lumps / c) spoonfuls of sugar should be mixed with the flour.

    10) Ten a) yards / b) metres of cloth are needed to upholster my sofa.

    11) Two a) soaps / b) bars of soap will be provided.
    (Is it possible to put "soap" in the plural?)

    Thank you in advance.
    All the best,
    Hela

    Last edited by hela; 12-Jan-2006 at 21:05.

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    #2

    Re: Uncountable nouns

    2- were on display
    3- tubes of toothpaste (unless it was differnet kinds)
    4- glass debris was
    5- sheep, we spell it Eid
    6- patterns
    7- fruit Fruits exists for different kinds, but I see no need for it here
    8- pieces
    9- spoonsfull is the most logical if your going to mix
    10- It depends- the UK has officialy gone metric, but the USA hasn't
    11- bars

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    #3

    Re: Uncountable nouns

    Thank you tdol.

    2. Is the preposition "on" correct here ?
    "Several jams were on display ON the market stalls" ?

    3. So do you call it "Eid El Kebir" or just "Eid"?

    See you,
    Hela

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    #4

    Re: Uncountable nouns

    2- Yes
    3- You see different spelling- I have seen ul/el/al for the second word. Simply 'Eid' is fairly common in usage in English, as many non-Muslims are unsure of the differences.

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    #5

    Re: Uncountable nouns

    Dear teachers,

    Would you please correct my exercise? Would you have more exercises like these to give me?

    1. Mathematics has never been my favourite subject.
    2. The news printed in that paper is never accurate.
    3. A second series of books on American literature is being planned by the publisher.
    4. Two gallons of paint is all we need.
    5. Ten minutes is too short a time to finish this test.
    6. The goods were shipped yesterday.
    7. The scissors were here a few minutes ago.
    8. The proceeds of the sale are going / will be going / are to go (?) to charity.
    9. Athletics has always been emphasized in this school.
    10. The premises of the school have been cleared of students because of a bomb threat.

    and
    11. After the party BITS OF (?) leftover food lay scattered on the floor.
    12. His clothes were covered with BLADES OF grass and BITS OF (?) straw.

    Thank you for your help,
    Hela
    Last edited by hela; 21-Jan-2006 at 07:50.

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    #6

    Re: Uncountable nouns

    They're correct, though some might use a plural in #2, especially in BrE. In #8, I'd use 'are to be'.

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