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  1. #1
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Any differences?

    Are there any differences between
    to catch on to someone and to see someone through?
    Are they used in specific contexts or do they mean the same?

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Any differences?

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Are there any differences between
    to catch on to someone and to see someone through?
    Are they used in specific contexts or do they mean the same?
    As far as I can see they mean entirely different things. Do you have any context for either of them?

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Any differences?

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Are there any differences between
    to catch on to someone and to see someone through?
    Are they used in specific contexts or do they mean the same?
    I think you're asking about "to see through someone", not "to see someone through".

  4. #4
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Any differences?

    Sorry, I made a mistake.

    For example in sentences like these:
    1) If you keep on lying to everyone, they'll eventually see through you/catch on to you.
    2) It took me a while, but I finally caught on to him/saw through him.
    3) In the end, I saw through him/caught on to him and ended our relationship.
    4) He's so charming and sly that few people see through him/catch on to him and realize that he's just a jerk.

    Don't they mean exactly the same?? I hope you can help with this.
    Last edited by dilodi83; 06-Oct-2012 at 14:25.

  5. #5
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Any differences?

    Any help?

  6. #6
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Any differences?

    I wouldn't use "catch on to".

  7. #7
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Any differences?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I wouldn't use "catch on to".
    why? is it not used so much? Is "see through" more common in everyday's English?

  8. #8
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Any differences?

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Why? Is it not used so much? Is "see through" more common in everyday English?
    I would use "see through".

  9. #9
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Any differences?

    Just because you like it more? or is there a specific reason about it??

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Any differences?

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    1) If you keep on lying to everyone, they'll eventually see through you/catch on to you.
    2) It took me a while, but I finally caught on to him/saw through him.
    3) In the end, I saw through him/caught on to him and ended our relationship.
    4) He's so charming and sly that few people see through him/catch on to him and realize that he's just a jerk.
    NOT A TEACHER

    In all of your sentences, there is some kind of deceptive behaviour going on, which is why "see through" would be my choice as well.

    Take a look at the following example sentences, taken from the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English:
    1 see through somebody/something to realize that someone is trying to deceive you :
    I saw through his excuses.
    I could never lie to her because I know she’d see through me straight away.
    I can’t bluff – she’d see right through me .
    "Catch on to" is used differently:
    2 to begin to understand or realize something catch on to
    It was a long time before the police caught on to what he was really doing.

    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 06-Oct-2012 at 17:06.

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