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  1. #1
    maoyueh is offline Member
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    as it is/as they are,etc.

    In the sentence "Leave it as it is" , the clause "as it is" is an adjective clause used as an objective complement, or an adverbial clause modifying the verb "leave"? Thank you so much.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: as it is/as they are,etc.

    It doesn't fit the conventional model of an adjectival clause

  3. #3
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: as it is/as they are,etc.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,


    I think that we can parse it this way:

    (You) = subject.

    leave = verb.

    it = object.

    as = "in the way in which"

    it = subject.

    is = verb. ( = exists)

    Thus, as you suggested, "as it is" is an adverbial clause modifying "leave."


    Answers the question "How should I leave it?"

    NOTES:

    1. Some books refer to "as" in your sentence as a conjunction. Other books feel it is more accurate to call it a relative adverb.

    2. Some people use the "incorrect" like in your sentence: "Leave it like it is."

    3. Some people leave out the subject of the subordinate clause: "Hey! Leave it as is!"


    James


    References:

    House and Harman, Descriptive English Grammar (1950).
    Paul Roberts, Understanding Grammar (1954).

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