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    #1

    to whiskey as a verb

    "He's a rough one when he gets whiskeyed up".
    Does it mean I could use "whiskey" as a verb to mean being drunk?
    Last edited by ostap77; 09-Oct-2012 at 16:35.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to whiskey as a verb

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "He's a rough one when he gets whiskeyed up".
    Does it mean I could use "whiskey" as a verb to mean being drunk?
    No, it means that this is used in the speaker's dialect. The verb in your example is 'to get whiskeyed up', not 'to whiskey'.
    I'd imagine it's only applicable if he's drinking whiskey, but I'm not familiar with the term.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to whiskey as a verb

    I have heard people say "when he's beered up" or "when he's vodka-ed up" meaning "When he is drunk on beer" or "When he is drunk on vodka". It's certainly colloquial and I wouldn't recommend using it.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to whiskey as a verb

    I'd say "when he's liquored up" is not uncommon, but that doesn't make it a transitive verb so that you could "liquor" someone.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: to whiskey as a verb

    It's possible, colloquial and context dependent.

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