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  1. #1
    KEN JPN is offline Junior Member
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    Default Is this answer really correct?

    Complete the sentence using the most appropriate word from below:

    I ( ) hurry or I'll be late.

    a. must
    b. mustn't
    c. had to


    This is a question from
    "Basic Grammar in Use with answers Self-study reference and practice for students of English Second Edition"
    (by Raymond Murphy with William R. Smalzer )

    According to that book, the answer is c (had to).
    Why "HAD(not "have") to" is good here?
    MUST sounds much better, I think.
    If the option is "have to", it will surely match here, though.
    Is this simply a misprint?

  2. #2
    HanibalII is offline Member
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    Default Re: Is this answer really correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by KEN JPN View Post
    Complete the sentence using the most appropriate word from below:

    I ( ) hurry or I'll be late.

    a. must
    b. mustn't
    c. had to


    This is a question from
    "Basic Grammar in Use with answers Self-study reference and practice for students of English Second Edition"
    (by Raymond Murphy with William R. Smalzer )

    According to that book, the answer is c (had to).
    Why "HAD(not "have") to" is good here?
    MUST sounds much better, I think.
    If the option is "have to", it will surely match here, though.
    Is this simply a misprint?

    It depends on the tense.

    Have to implies present tense.
    Had to implies past tense.

    If you use 'have' you'll be changing the meaning of the sentence.
    'Must' would've also been an appropriate choice, because in that structure, it also refers to present tense, the same as 'had to'.


    To me, that sentence sounds strange though anyway.

    The sentence is obviously directed at a second person, given the use of I'll.

    Honestly, I would've had it.

    "I had to hurry or I'd be late" for past tense.
    "I have to hurry or I'll be late" for present tense.

    Given the choice though, 'had to' is the most appropriate.
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

  3. #3
    fahimkaldane1991 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Is this answer really correct?

    Its a misprint because had the answer been 'C', the actual sentence would have been something like this," I had to hurry, else I would have been late." .....
    The correct answer is 'A', " I must hurry, else I will be late"..



    Please note that neither am I a teacher nor a native English speaker, but I have finished 10+2 in a British School and have scored Band 7 in IELTS (International English language testing System).
    Last edited by fahimkaldane1991; 10-Oct-2012 at 11:49.

  4. #4
    HanibalII is offline Member
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    Default Re: Is this answer really correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by fahimkaldane1991 View Post
    Its a misprint bcoz had it been c then the actual sentence would have been something like this," I had to hurry, else I would have been late." .....
    The correct answer is a. " I must hurry, else I will be late"..

    Where did you get the 'else' from?

    'I had to hurry, or I would have been late' is a normal sentence.


    Also, please don't use text speak. It may confuse some users, and is just butchered English.
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

  5. #5
    KEN JPN is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Is this answer really correct?

    This is a BASIC grammar for beginners.
    So, the book(author) asks for ONLY ONE CORRECT ANSWER among "must, mustn't, had to".

    I cannot think of any good context where HAD TO can fit in
    "I had to hurry or I'll (=WILL) be late".

    If the latter part of this sentence was "I'd (I would)", "I had to hurry" would be good.

    I still doubt that answer was a misprint.

  6. #6
    fahimkaldane1991 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Is this answer really correct?

    According to you answer " I had to hurry " this is a past perfect tense.

    " I would be late " this is a past continuous tense. Grammatically speaking the sentence is incorrect. Your sentence is in two parts, the first part states that the person had to hurry....this means he has finished with the work.

    And the second part states that the person will be running late.

    yet correct me if I am wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post
    It depends on the tense.

    Have to implies present tense.
    Had to implies past tense.

    If you use 'have' you'll be changing the meaning of the sentence.
    'Must' would've also been an appropriate choice, because in that structure, it also refers to present tense, the same as 'had to'.


    To me, that sentence sounds strange though anyway.

    The sentence is obviously directed at a second person, given the use of I'll.

    Honestly, I would've had it.

    "I had to hurry or I'd be late" for past tense.
    "I have to hurry or I'll be late" for present tense.

    Given the choice though, 'had to' is the most appropriate.

  7. #7
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Default Re: Is this answer really correct?

    Only 'I must hurry or I'll be late' is correct in this context.

    Fahimkaldane, welcome to the forums. Please read this extract from the Posting Guidlines:


    You are welcome to answer questions posted in the Ask a Teacher forum as long as your suggestions, help, and advice reflect a good understanding of the English language. If you are not a teacher, you will need to state that clearly at the top of your post.

    ​Rover

  8. #8
    fahimkaldane1991 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Is this answer really correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post
    Where did you get the 'else' from?

    'I had to hurry, or I would have been late' is a normal sentence.


    Also, please don't use text speak. It may confuse some users, and is just butchered English.
    I didn't reply with the quote so forgot what was originally written and used 'else' instead of 'or'. it doesn't make a big difference though.

    And what do you mean by text speak and butchered English?
    Kindly tell me as I would try to avoid it.

  9. #9
    HanibalII is offline Member
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    Default Re: Is this answer really correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by fahimkaldane1991 View Post
    I didn't reply with the quote so forgot what was originally written and used 'else' instead of 'or'. it doesn't make a big difference though.

    And what do you mean by text speak and butchered English?
    Kindly tell me as I would try to avoid it.

    Text speak (bcoz) is nothing more than butchered English.

    It's also not allowed on the forums, because it confuses the many learners that post here.
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

  10. #10
    charliedeut's Avatar
    charliedeut is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Is this answer really correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by fahimkaldane1991 View Post
    And what do you mean by text speak and
    Quote Originally Posted by fahimkaldane1991 View Post
    It's a misprint bcoz [this is text speak for "because"], had it been 'C', then the actual sentence would have been something like this
    We are trying to get people to learn English. Therefore, we discourage the use of text speak (some other members refer to it as "chatspeak"), so that learners will not be confused/misled.

    Also, I have pointed out certain things I would amend in your statement, as you see.

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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