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  1. #1
    yanx is offline Member
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    Default cruise to victory

    Hi,

    What is the opposite of cruise to victory as in Bolt cruised to victory in 100m final?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: cruise to victory

    Why should there be a direct opposite? You could lose by a wide margin or something, but winning easily is the opposite of what- coming second or coming last?

  3. #3
    yanx is offline Member
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    Default Re: cruise to victory

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Why should there be a direct opposite? You could lose by a wide margin or something, but winning easily is the opposite of what- coming second or coming last?
    Thanks! But what I meant was the opposite of Cruise to victory, which is something like "difficult victory". I can't find a proper word or phrase. Hopefully you can help me with this.. Thanks again!

  4. #4
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    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: cruise to victory

    It was a hard-fought victory.
    It was a close call, but he won in the end.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: cruise to victory


  6. #6
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: cruise to victory

    Or narrow victory.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: cruise to victory

    If it looked like the winner was actually going to lose until the very end of the race, you can say "He/she snatched victory from the jaws of defeat".

    Rather sarcastically, if someone is in the lead for most of a race and then loses right at the very end, we also say "He snatched defeat from the jaws of victory"!
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  8. #8
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: cruise to victory

    There's also the idea of a race going 'down to the wire'. The wire in question is presumably something like the finishing tape that is sometimes used in foot races. But even, say, a Presidential Election can 'go down to the wire'.

    Another, is 'it's anybody's race' - but that's more often used in predictions.

    b

    PS Another one is to say that two competitors are 'neck-and-neck'; I imagine that term comes from horse racing (as a horse can still win a race 'by a neck'). But, although a human runner's neck doesn't stick out (the leading part is the chest, from which we get the expression 'to breast the tape' [=finish first]), it is still accepteble to say that two runners are neck-and-neck.
    Last edited by BobK; 15-Oct-2012 at 13:56. Reason: PS added

  9. #9
    yanx is offline Member
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    Default Re: cruise to victory



    Thanks very much for all your help!

    My feeling is that all the answers are good to me, but I found emsr2d2 and Bobk's answers particularly helpful because they gave me much information. Thanks! If anyone has any other good idea, please tell me and I would highly appreciate it..
    Last edited by yanx; 15-Oct-2012 at 13:38.

  10. #10
    yanx is offline Member
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    Default Re: cruise to victory

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    There's also the idea of a race going 'down to the wire'. The wire in question is presumably something like the finishing tape that is sometimes used in foot races. But even, say, a Presidential Election can 'go down to the wire'.

    Another, is 'it's anybody's race' - but that's more often used in predictions.

    b
    Thanks Bobk! Could you give me a context on how to use "It's anybody's race" as you said?

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