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  1. #1
    david11's Avatar
    david11 is offline Senior Member
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    Default still a week from now

    Will you be a Minister still a week from now?

    (Context: It is a question asked to a minster, who has corruption charges, in an interview.)

    This is the first time I am seeing the word "still" used in this way.

    What is the difference between the above and this sentence; Will you be a minister after a week from now?


  2. #2
    Grumpy's Avatar
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    Default Re: still a week from now

    It will normally be phrased as: "Will you still be a minister a week from now?" or "Will you still be a minister in a week's time?
    In this context "still" means "continue to be", or "remain".
    There's no difference in meaning between the 2 sentences you have quoted, but I would not use the second one.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: still a week from now

    Quote Originally Posted by david11 View Post
    Will you be a Minister still a week from now?

    (Context: It is a question asked to a minster, who has corruption charges, in an interview.)

    This is the first time I am seeing the word "still" used in this way.

    What is the difference between the above and this sentence; Will you be a minister after a week from now?

    The difference is mainly that you won't hear "Will you be a minister after a week from now?" You might hear "Will you be a minister in a week/in a week's time?"
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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