Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Will17 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,175
    Post Thanks / Like

    Cool free or for free

    Hello,

    Can we use "free" and "for free" interchangeably here, please?

    "Nowthe hour was late and the woman (who had no money) was getting desperate. She rusheddown to the ferry and pleaded with the ferryboat captain. He knew heras a regular customer. She asked if he could let her ride free/for free and ifshe could pay the next night. "

    Thanks a lot for your help,

    Will

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    21,405
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: free or for free

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Hello,

    Can we use "free" and "for free" interchangeably here, please?

    "Nowthe hour was late and the woman (who had no money) was getting desperate. She rusheddown to the ferry and pleaded with the ferryboat captain. He knew heras a regular customer. She asked if he could let her ride free/for free and ifshe could pay the next night. "

    Thanks a lot for your help,

    Will
    Only "for free" works there. For future information, when you copy and paste text, have a look at it again after you post it and, if necessary, go in to edit the spacing (see red text above). The copy/paste function on this forum unfortunately regularly messes up the formatting of the original and then has to be edited.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    13,066
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: free or for free

    As the adverb free means 'for nothing' or 'without charge', I always find an extra 'for' redundant.

    Rover

  4. #4
    Will17 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,175
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: free or for free

    Understood, sorry.

Similar Threads

  1. I'm free
    By Nathan Mckane in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-Aug-2010, 18:08
  2. free to / free for
    By camomilabarbieri in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Jul-2009, 17:16
  3. did the job for free/free of charge/for free of charge
    By Tan Elaine in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 16-Apr-2009, 17:57
  4. For free
    By sadeadu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 29-May-2008, 17:06
  5. Use of FREE
    By Shad in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Nov-2006, 17:47

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk