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    #1

    Long time no see

    I assigned a letter to my student that invites his friend to a dinner party at his home. He was expreceted to write the letter in informal style.
    One of my students wrote, “Haven’t seen you for a long time, how are you?” Could I replace it with “Long time no see, how are you?” I think the sencond one is often used in spoken English, so maybe it is more informal than the first one. What is your opnion? Thank you.

  1. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Long time no see

    "Long time no see" is very informal: certainly more so than "Haven't seen you for a long time". It's certainly used in spoken, colloquial English - but you may think that it is a bit too​ informal to use in a written invitation to dinner.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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    #3

    Re: Long time no see

    Also, there's nothing formal about what your student originally wrote.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Long time no see

    The comma splice bothers me, though. . How are you?

    A comma splice isn't informal. It's just wrong.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. lingokid's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Long time no see

    I love "long time no see".....it helps absolute beginneers get into the Anglo-Saxon way of informal expressions as well.:)

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