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  1. #1
    patran is offline Member
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    Default Anorak language, management goulash and British accens

    Dear Teachers

    Sorry to bother you again.

    I am listening to an interview of Chris Patten with Andrew Marr, two questions I would like to see your advice.

    Chris Patten on future of the BBC (03July11) - YouTube
    First, I hear that in 1:00 and 1:02, Chris (white hair guy) said the following words, am I correct? And what exactly he means?

    a) Anorak language (01:00)?

    b) Management goulash (01:02)?

    Second, what is the major difference in the accents of Chris and Andrew? I am just curious, are their accents considered good and well-read in the eyes of Brits?

    Look forward to hearing from you soon

    Regards

    Anthony the learner

  2. #2
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    Grumpy is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Anorak language, management goulash and British accens

    You heard correctly. They concern different aspects of the use of language.

    The expression "Anorak" refers to an introverted perfectionist or pedant [British train-spotters are generally assumed to wear anoraks, as do computer geeks], so in saying "Get away from the Anorak language..," Chris Patten means that he does not want to be tied down by narrow definitions of what his job entails.

    "Management Goulash" refers to what is also known as "management-speak", which applies to people using words and phrases which they think make them sound well informed and important, rather than using simple, straight-forward words. For example, such expressions as "a holistic, cradle-to-grave approach", or "paradigm shifts", or "stakeholders" are heard all too often. Chris Patten's official job specification will undoubtedly be well laced with that sort of rubbish, and he wants to explain his role in simple terms.

    The major difference in their accents is that Chris Patten has an English accent, while Andrew Marr has a Scots accent. Both men are instantly recognisable from their speech as being well educated, sophisticated individuals.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  3. #3
    patran is offline Member
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    Default Re: Anorak language, management goulash and British accens

    Thanks Grumpy. Your remarks help me a lot! Thanks very much.

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