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    #1

    What does "math-challenged" mean?

    Does it mean "clearly (as mathematics) challeged"?

    OneWord offers no entry for this.

    And does "across the aisle" mean "bipartisanly cooperative"?


    Context:

    But as voters know, that's a tall order. Is his promise of sweeping fiscal reform credible?
    The answer may be a "good news, bad news" story. On the positive side, it appears likely that whoever wins will face public and financial-market pressure to address the nation's fiscal problems. And many economists embrace a basic tenet of Romney's plan: to focus on generating economic growth, not solely on closing budget deficits in Washington.
    On the negative side, however, are some serious doubts. Independent finance experts have asserted that Romney's fiscal plans are math-challenged. And even if his desire to work "across the aisle" is sincere, some analysts question whether he could deliver bipartisan cooperation, given the rigid party lines visible in Congress on issues like taxes.


    More:

    Mitt Romney's big economics speech: Can he deliver 'big change?' - CSMonitor.com
    Last edited by NewHopeR; 27-Oct-2012 at 06:23. Reason: the meaning of "across the aisle"

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    #2

    Re: What does "math-challenged" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHopeR View Post
    Does it mean "clearly (as mathematics) challeged"?

    OneWord offers no entry for this.

    And does "across the aisle" mean "bipartisanly cooperative"?


    Context:

    But as voters know, that's a tall order. Is his promise of sweeping fiscal reform credible?
    The answer may be a "good news, bad news" story. On the positive side, it appears likely that whoever wins will face public and financial-market pressure to address the nation's fiscal problems. And many economists embrace a basic tenet of Romney's plan: to focus on generating economic growth, not solely on closing budget deficits in Washington.
    On the negative side, however, are some serious doubts. Independent finance experts have asserted that Romney's fiscal plans are math-challenged. And even if his desire to work "across the aisle" is sincere, some analysts question whether he could deliver bipartisan cooperation, given the rigid party lines visible in Congress on issues like taxes.


    More:

    Mitt Romney's big economics speech: Can he deliver 'big change?' - CSMonitor.com
    Math challenged means that the numbers projected by his fiscal plans do not add up correctly. He says one thing but the numbers indicate another thing. Someone who works "across the aisle" is someone who can work with members of a different political party. The aisle, or a narrow pathway, separates the members of the elected members of the legislative part of the US government.

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