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  1. #1
    youngbut is offline Newbie
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    Can I say "change an old tire for a new one"?

    Hi, everyone.^^

    I would like to know if I can say "I will change an old tire for a new one." I have googled this phrase, but there was not any result. I guess the verb "replace" or "sbubtitute" could be possible instead of "change". However, to me all of those verbs have the same meaning. In addition, there were many cases of "change an old tire" while not "change a old tire for a new one". In which cases or with what connotations should I use the verb change?


    many thanks in advance ^^

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Can I say "change an old tire for a new one"?

    "Change" is the right verb for switching tires. People would normally say they are going to buy new tires. The fact that you are going to replace old for new doesn't need to be said explicitly.

  3. #3
    billmcd is offline Key Member
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    Re: Can I say "change an old tire for a new one"?

    Quote Originally Posted by youngbut View Post
    Hi, everyone.^^

    I would like to know if I can say "I will change an old tire for a new one." I have googled this phrase, but there was not any result. I guess the verb "replace" or "sbubtitute" could be possible instead of "change". However, to me all of those verbs have the same meaning. In addition, there were many cases of "change an old tire" while not "change a old tire for a new one". In which cases or with what connotations should I use the verb change?


    many thanks in advance ^^
    "Change" would be understandable, but as always, depending on context. I would be inclined to simply say, "I'm going to get a new tire", with the understanding that the old tire was damaged or worn.

  4. #4
    youngbut is offline Newbie
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    Re: Can I say "change an old tire for a new one"?

    Thank you for your advices, SoothigDaive and billmcd.

    Actually, this question came to me when I saw "change A for B" and "replace/substitute A with B" in a dictionary. The dictionary gives the ESL students like me some fixed patterns that show some collocations between verbs and "prepostions". It's kind of their obligation because to us the "prepositons" are kind of evil, which don't show their real faces.

    Anyway, When I run into "change A for B" and "replace/substitute A with B", I could not helping asking myself why only the verb change is with the preposition "for" and whether I can use "for" with the other verbs. As I searched about it on the internet, I realized the use of native speaekers for "prepositions" with the verbs are very various, and it can not be explained just by the letters from dictionaries. Anyway I made some sentences including them, to figure out it.

    (1) I changed him with her. (Is this sentence possible to mean "I removed(or send away) him and got her."?)
    (2) I changed him for her. (Does this sentence have two possible interpretations?: I removed him and got her, and I made him chagne for the sake of her.)

    Frankly I have more questions related to the other verbs. But I guess I already bother you too much.
    Thank you for reading my stupid questions.
    Last edited by youngbut; 30-Oct-2012 at 05:25.

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