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    #1

    give the game away , new to the game

    I am trying to make sentences with give the game away and new to the game as follow.


    1. May's colleagues look her down because she has just joined the company and she's new to the game.

    2. Dave and Jo do not want to disclose an intimacy has grown between them to their friends, however, Jo's mum gave the game away.


    Are my sentences OK?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: give the game away , new to the game

    They're OK with a few small changes:

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    1. May's colleagues look down on her because she has just joined the company and she's new to the game.

    2. Dave and Jo do not want to disclose
    their growing intimacy to their friends. However, Jo's mum gave the game away.
    Rover

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    #3

    Re: give the game away , new to the game

    Is "give the game away" a way to say "let the cat out of the bag"? It's not one I know.

    I would have thought it meant "threw" the game - deliberately did something to cause a failure.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: give the game away , new to the game

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Is "give the game away" a way to say "let the cat out of the bag"? It's not one I know.

    I would have thought it meant "threw" the game - deliberately did something to cause a failure.
    I agree. I might say that she "gave it away" -- meaning that she revealed their secret.

    I would use "gave the game away" literally to describe someone who made a mistake (fumbled the football, for example) and caused his team to lose. Not necessarily deliberately.

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    #5

    Re: give the game away , new to the game

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Not necessarily deliberately.
    You're right - not necessarily deliberately.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: give the game away , new to the game

    give the game away

    informal

    Definition

    to spoil a surprise or a joke by telling someone something that should have been kept secret It's a secret, so don't give the game away, will you?

    Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus Cambridge University Press)
    .

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    #7

    Re: give the game away , new to the game

    I think it may need a "Chiefly British" citation, but it's Cambridge, so that may be implied.

    Is this a commonly used expression?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: give the game away , new to the game

    Yes - it's very common.

    We use 'throw the game' for the other meaning.

    Rover

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    #9

    Re: give the game away , new to the game

    "Throwing a game" is deliberate. "Giving the game away" need not be.

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