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  1. #1
    youngbut is offline Newbie
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    About "stand him up"

    Hi, everyone.
    I guess I could say "I stood him on the ground/on the chair.". However, I wonder what can be different if I say "I stood him up on the chair". If I use "up" can it mean he originally had sit down and I made him stand up?

    many thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: About "stand him up"

    What or who does him refer to?

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: About "stand him up"

    Quote Originally Posted by youngbut View Post
    Hi, everyone.
    I guess I could say "I stood him on the ground/on the chair.". However, I wonder what can be different if I say "I stood him up on the chair". If I use "up" can it mean he originally had sit down and I made him stand up?

    Many thanks in advance.

    If you stand someone or something up, it suggests that they are either unwilling or incapable of standing up themselves.

    If you are the parent of a small child who is just learning to walk and the child falls over and can't get up, you might put your hands under his armpits and bring him to a standing position again so that he can continue to practice walking. You stood the child up.

    If you accidentally knock over a vase (or anything) and you want to put it back to its original position, you pick it up and return it to the upright position. You stand it up, or stand it back up.

    If you say "I stood him up on a chair", I would say that it gives us no information about his original position, but you picked him up and placed him on a chair so that he was standing on the chair.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 02-Nov-2012 at 16:16. Reason: Missed missing punctuation
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. #4
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: About "stand him up"

    Urban Dictionary: stood up

    "To be stood up" also has the meaning of being left waiting for a date who never shows up.

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: About "stand him up"

    But it would be hard to use that meaning with on a chair unless you had agreed to meet on one.

  6. #6
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: About "stand him up"

    Where else? After 'Under the clock at Waterloo station', chairs are my favourite meeting place.

    b

  7. #7
    youngbut is offline Newbie
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    Re: About "stand him up"

    Hi, emsr2d2

    I should have specified the pronoun 'him' and also my question more. I just felt a big diffence between the verb "stand" in English and the equivalent in my first language, but I could not figure out where it came from. But After Your wise answer for my stupid question, I could find it.
    Thank you for your kindness and thoughtfulness.

    According to what you taught me, I can guess "stand the boy" as a form of excluding "up", also implies some physical contact. So, if I say "I stood the boy on the chair for him to see the parade better" or "I stood the boy on the chair as a punishment", the both cases somehow imply a physical contact such as "hold his hand" or "drag him by his shoulder" (Am I going on the right way? )


    If it is so, do the two following setences "I made him stood on the chair as a punishment" and "I got him to stood him on the chair as a punishemnt." not have that kind of directness or some physical contacts?


    P.S : At first, before I read your advice, I guessed "stand someone" is used for a more undirect way, and "stand someone up" could be a more dircect way. In my first language it is an important element of transitive verbs which has their own signal in grammar. But to me English verbs seemed not to have that kind thing as a form of grammar, at least to me. But I thought Egnlish has it in its way. and it could be the prepostions accompnying verbs, I thought. But after follwing your comment I don't think so now, though I don't sure about it completely. Always confused.^^
    Last edited by youngbut; 03-Nov-2012 at 02:19.

  8. #8
    youngbut is offline Newbie
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    Re: About "stand him up"

    Hi

    'to be stood up' sounds interesting.In this case does not "up" imply only a vertical stance? It seems to me that "up" expressed a long time because I know the emotion of waiting with a bunch of flower.^^
    Last edited by youngbut; 03-Nov-2012 at 03:08.

  9. #9
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: About "stand him up"

    Quote Originally Posted by youngbut View Post
    Hi, emsr2d2

    I should have specified the pronoun 'him' and also my question more. I just felt a big diffence between the verb "stand" in English and the equivalent in my first language, but I could not figure out where it came from. But After Your wise answer for my stupid question, I could find it.
    Thank you for your kindness and thoughtfulness.

    According to what you taught me, I can guess "stand the boy" as a form of excluding "up", also implies some physical contact. So, if I say "I stood the boy on the chair for him to see the parade better" or "I stood the boy on the chair as a punishment", the both cases somehow imply a physical contact such as "hold his hand" or "drag him by his shoulder" (Am I going on the right way? )

    I stood the boy on a chair so that he could see the parade better.


    If it is so, do the two following setences "I made him stood on the chair as a punishment" and "I got him to stood him on the chair as a punishemnt." not have that kind of directness or some physical contacts?

    I made him stand on the chair as a punishment.
    I got him to stand on the chair as a punishment.


    P.S : At first, before I read your advice, I guessed "stand someone" is used for a more undirect way, and "stand someone up" could be a more dircect way. In my first language it is an important element of transitive verbs which has their own signal in grammar. But to me English verbs seemed not to have that kind thing as a form of grammar, at least to me. But I thought Egnlish has it in its way. and it could be the prepostions accompnying verbs, I thought. But after follwing your comment I don't think so now, though I don't sure about it completely. Always confused.^^
    We don't say "to stand someone" very often and never without something else after it. We might use "to stand something" followed by the position.

    I stood him up on the chair. (Physical contact - I picked the boy up and put him on a chair.)
    I stood the vase over there. (Physical contact - I picked the vase up and placed it where I wanted it.)
    My new boyfriend stood me up the other night. (I waited at a pre-arranged location but my boyfriend didn't turn up.)
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: About "stand him up"

    Quote Originally Posted by youngbut View Post
    But After Your wise answer for my stupid question, I could find it.
    Questions aren't stupid- they're how we learn.

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