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  1. #11
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: About "stand him up"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    We don't say "to stand someone" very often and never without something else after it. ...
    - in this sense of 'stand'.

    Some of my students can't stand me

    b
    Last edited by 5jj; 03-Nov-2012 at 16:34.

  2. #12
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: About "stand him up"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    - in this sense of 'stand'.

    Some of my students can't stand me

    b
    Oops! Yes, indeed we do say "to be able to stand someone" in that way.

    I can't stand liquorice.
    My brother can't stand seafood.
    No-one I know can stand the Prime Minister.

    I should point out that we don't use this in the positive, so we don't say "I can stand the Prime Minister" to mean "I like him". However, you might hear "I can just about stand celery as long as there's not too much in the food".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #13
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: About "stand him up"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    ...

    I should point out that we don't use this in the positive, so we don't say "I can stand the Prime Minister" to mean "I like him". However, you might hear "I can just about stand celery as long as there's not too much in the food".
    The oft-misquoted line from Casablanca is 'If she can stand it, I can! Play it!', which seems to be a counter-example; but there's a sense of negativeness (Rick had previously forbidden it). So "As Time Goes By" sort of occupies the same space as celery!

    b

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