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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    "... is nigh on impossible, ..."



    "The conflict in Syria has become a civil war. Contrary to Freedland's claims that western intervention is nigh on impossible, the west and its supporters – Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar – are already directly intervening, providing arms and other military support."

    More: There is no hypocrisy or silence in Stop the War's stance on Syria


    "nigh on impossible" means almost impossible, isn't? Is it an idiom?

    Last edited by Odessa Dawn; 02-Nov-2012 at 18:36. Reason: It's "nigh" not "neigh." Innit has been deleted.

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    #2

    Re: "... is nigh on impossible, ..."

    It's "nigh" not "neigh."

    Yes, this is idiomatic. "Nigh" is an archaic word meaning "near." It's nearly impossible.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "... is nigh on impossible, ..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post


    "The conflict in Syria has become a civil war. Contrary to Freedland's claims that western intervention is nigh on impossible, the west and its supporters – Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar – are already directly intervening, providing arms and other military support."

    More: There is no hypocrisy or silence in Stop the War's stance on Syria


    "nigh on impossible" means almost impossible, innit? Is it an idiom?

    Please please please do not use the horrible "innit"! It's used by uneducated chavs in the UK and is the bane of many of our lives.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "... is nigh on impossible, ..."

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Ali G certainly used it to great effect ... but then again, he also said stuff like:

    Has you ever interviewed Shakespeares?

    Why did Jesus go around with all them reindeers?

    If you use "innit", your education may be called into question. As emsr2d2 said, it's best to avoid it altogether, unless you know what you're doing and what kind of effect you're creating.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 02-Nov-2012 at 20:16.

  4. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "... is nigh on impossible, ..."



    Thank you, emsr2d2 and Chicken Sandwich, for your comments. Believe me that I think ten times before thinking of writing in English. I utilized that word because it has been used in The Guardian, but I will listen to you. Yes, I have to understand not only English grammar but also the culture in which it is spoken. In a nutshell, I will not use it even at the cost of my own life. Your forgiveness, dears.


  5. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "... is nigh on impossible, ..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    I utilized that word because it has been used in The Guardian, but I will listen to you.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Yes, and they also used "enuf" in the headline. Do you see why they used these words?

  6. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "... is nigh on impossible, ..."



    To attract others' attentions that English language is being neglected because some people who donít care about it or they need us to read between lines since there is a problem needs to be taken into account. Also, people have changed. If I am not mistaken, the whole idea is to take care of words that are not standard.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "... is nigh on impossible, ..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post


    To attract others' attentions that English language is being neglected because some people who don’t care about it or they need us to read between lines since there is a problem needs to be taken into account. Also, people have changed. If I am not mistaken, the whole idea is to take care of words that are not standard.
    When you said "to take care of words that are not standard", did you mean "to be careful of ..." or "to look after"?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: "... is nigh on impossible, ..."



    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    When you said "to take care of words that are not standard", did you mean "to be careful of ..." or "to look after"?

    Thank you. "to be careful of ..."


  9. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: "... is nigh on impossible, ..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post

    Thank you. "to be careful of ..."

    Then that is what you should say. Or you can say "Beware of ..."
    If you say "take care of" then we read it to mean "to look after".
    If you say "take care with" then that is closer to the correct meaning.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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