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Thread: who does

  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default who does

    1. What does this "resources" mean? The translation goes "something to spare" as a liberal translation, but is it 4 in Resource | Define Resource at Dictionary.com?
    2. Can a pro-verb "do" come before the original verb? It refers to "have", but usually pro-verbs come after the original verb. It's confusing to find its match as I'm used to finding it backward.

    ex)It is becoming increasingly important to write and publish your paper in English, whatever your native language is. This puts a writer whose first language is not English at a disadvantage in a highly competitive market. While editors may be sympathetic to the difficulties faced by non-English speaking authors, most editors do not have the resources to spend time rewriting a paper written in very poor English. It is therefore essential to get your manuscript read by someone who does, if you don’t have English as a first language. If that person is not an expert in the field on which you are writing, you will also need the advice of ....
    Last edited by keannu; 03-Nov-2012 at 03:05.

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: who does

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1. What does this "resources" mean? The translation goes "something to spare" as a liberal translation, but is it 4 in Resource | Define Resource at Dictionary.com?
    2. Can a pro-verb "do" come before the original verb? It refers to "have", but usually pro-verbs come after the original verb. It's confusing to find its match as I'm used to finding it backward.

    ex)It is becoming increasingly important to write and publish your paper in English, whatever your native language is. This puts a writer whose first language is not English at a disadvantage in a highly competitive market. While editors may be sympathetic to the difficulties faced by non-English
    speaking authors, most editors do not have the resources to spend time rewriting a paper written in very poor English. It is therefore harmful to get your manuscript read by someone who does, if you don’t have English as a first language. If that person is not an expert in the field on which you are writing, you will also need the advice of ....
    1. It doesn't mean the editors lack the mental ability to help. It means they don't have the time for themselves or their staff to rewrite poor English.

    2. "Does" refers to someone who does have the resources, not someone who does have English as a first language.

  3. #3
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default Re: who does

    So in 2, you mean pro-verbs like "do" or "does" never precede the original verb, right?

  4. #4
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: who does

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    So in 2, you mean pro-verbs like "do" or "does" never precede the original verb, right?
    I've never heard of a "pro-verb" (as opposed to a proverb). But I don't think it is possible to have them precede their reference. Sort of like pronouns come after their antecedents.

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