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    #1

    what difference is there if some adverbs are combined with prepositions

    Since I am not a native speaker, it is really hard to recognize the subtle difference between the adverbs with different prepositions. For example, early vs early on / later vs later on / hang about vs hang around / give off vs give out and etc.

    and this is also relevant to my question that why people say 'go off to the library' instead of 'go to the library' and 'off the beach' to mean similar to 'along the beach'
    I expect I would make a progress if I manage to detect those sutbtle differences in using English.

    Thanks a lot!
    Last edited by zzang418lee; 08-Nov-2012 at 17:12.

  1. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: what difference is there if some adverbs are combined with prepositions

    There is really no significant difference between these usages. It's mostly a matter of personal preference. Take "early/later" vs "early/later on". If I was talking about the passage of time during the day, I'd probably use "early that day" and "later that day"; whereas if I was referring to someone's career, I'd say "early on in his career" and "later on in his career". However, switching them round would be just as correct. Don't worry about it.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: what difference is there if some adverbs are combined with prepositions

    I can't think of a context where "off the beach" would mean the same as "along the beach".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #4

    Re: what difference is there if some adverbs are combined with prepositions

    then could you tell me what 'off the beach' mean exactly?

    Thank you

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: what difference is there if some adverbs are combined with prepositions

    If you can give me an example sentence containing it, I can tell you what I think was meant by it.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: what difference is there if some adverbs are combined with prepositions

    Perhaps they are saying "off to the beach" and "along to the beach"; which mean the same thing.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  5. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: what difference is there if some adverbs are combined with prepositions

    Here it can at times; my apartment is located just off the beach (along the beach); we had a little barbecue just off the beach...

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: what difference is there if some adverbs are combined with prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Here it can at times; my apartment is located just off the beach (along the beach); we had a little barbecue just off the beach...
    For me, an apartment "just off the beach" would be slightly behind the beach. An apartment "along the beach" is on the beach but further along from where you are standing when you say it.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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