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    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
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      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2012
    • Posts: 2
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    #1

    "One person two letters" OR "two persons one letter each"?

    A call for a job position requires
    "Two reference letters written by a scientist in related field."

    I thought they want me to have "one person writes two letters". But they said no. "Two persons should write a letter separately".

    Is there any chance to justify their claim? It's a sentence in a job call for a research institute in Japan. I only prepared two letters from one person, but they said I am failed. There was a japanese text as well, but it was more vague so that I referred the english part.

    The person who wrote the call is actually bad at english. And I am at this level.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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      • Retired English Teacher
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      • British English
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      • Czech Republic

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    #2

    Re: "One person two letters" OR "two persons one letter each"?

    Quote Originally Posted by yagigoyaneko View Post
    "Two reference letters written by a scientist in related field."
    The intended meaning is not clear.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: "One person two letters" OR "two persons one letter each"?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    The intended meaning is not clear.
    All right, it seems not only their fault, then. Thanks.

    • Member Info
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    #4

    Re: "One person two letters" OR "two persons one letter each"?

    The English may not be too clear, but logic favours the two people writing a letter each view. If they needed two copies, they'd probably say 2 copies of a letter....

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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      • Other
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    #5

    Re: "One person two letters" OR "two persons one letter each"?

    I agree that "by a scientist" could imply that you need only one person, but as Tdol says, logic leads you to the intended meaning.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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