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  1. #1
    nelson13 is offline Member
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    Default I am a man of Chinese tradition

    In English, I don't think it is polite call someone by the full name; one other reason for not doing so is probably that using such a long name makes you stammer. However, in Chinese, especially for ancient Chinese people, a person's name is very often only two syllables and even for the writer I pay homage to, I always call him by the full Chinese name. Now I want to tell an American that I have to use this way of address in English:

    I am a man of (the) Chinese tradition, so I would like to call you by your full name....

    I just find this sentence strange but I am not sure how I can improve it; could anyone shed some light upon this knotty problem?

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I am a man of Chinese tradition

    When in Rome, do as the Romans do.

    There is no need to extend your Chinese traditions to dealings you have with Americans. If the American wants you to call him "Bob" or "Mr. Smith," there is no reason for you to insist on calling him "Bob Smith."

    It has nothing to do with stammering.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: I am a man of Chinese tradition

    I'd extend SoothingDave's advice speaking to the British too. Call us what we prefer to be called and get used to it.

  4. #4
    nelson13 is offline Member
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    Default Re: I am a man of Chinese tradition

    In fact, it is only an invented situation. I will not call someone by his full name face-to-face.(In private, especially to our professor, I will do so, though)

    I just hoped to know whether the sentence is OK....

    =================

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    When in Rome, do as the Romans do.

    There is no need to extend your Chinese traditions to dealings you have with Americans. If the American wants you to call him "Bob" or "Mr. Smith," there is no reason for you to insist on calling him "Bob Smith."

    It has nothing to do with stammering.
    By the way, why did you use the plural form? Can I regard it as a mass noun here and delete the S?

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I am a man of Chinese tradition

    Quote Originally Posted by nelson13 View Post
    In fact, it is only an invented situation. I will not call someone by his full name face-to-face.(In private, especially to our professor, I will do so, though)

    I just hoped to know whether the sentence is OK....

    =================


    By the way, why did you use the plural form? Can I regard it as a mass noun here and delete the S?
    I meant your traditions in general, but yes, you could make this singular as we were talking about this one particular tradition.

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