Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    patran is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    211
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default syncophant vs sycophant

    Dear Teachers

    I found the words "syncophant" and "sycophant" having very similar meanings. What is the main difference in using these two words? Please advise.


    Regards

    Anthony the learner

  2. #2
    Merle Tenney is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: syncophant vs sycophant

    It's kind of like regardless and irregardless. Both forms are found, and they mean the same thing, but only regardless is correct.

    The correct form is sycophant, which is found in every major dictionary. Syncophant is only found in Wordnik, which only documents usage, not correctness. Also, "a sycophant" has 209K hits on Google; "a syncophant" has just 8K hits.

    Bottom line: use sycophant.

    Merle

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,736
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: syncophant vs sycophant

    Quote Originally Posted by patran View Post
    Dear Teachers

    I found the words "syncophant" and "sycophant" having very similar meanings. What is the main difference in using these two words? Please advise.


    Regards

    Anthony the learner
    Urban Dictionary: syncophant

  4. #4
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,633
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: syncophant vs sycophant

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I particularly like the second part of definition #2.

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,263
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: syncophant vs sycophant

    I have never heard or come across anyone using syncophant.

  6. #6
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,799
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: syncophant vs sycophant

    I guess a synchrophant would suck up to you on a regular basis.

Similar Threads

  1. Sycophant
    By cmlg38542006 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-May-2009, 19:59

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •