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Thread: nearly

  1. #1
    Xavier_Nickelsen is offline Newbie
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    nearly

    Hi, Could somebody explain me difference between nearly and almost? I mean, which phrase is correct or if both are, what's the difference?

    1. Tom nearly lost his leg in the accident.
    2. Tom almost lost his leg in the accident.

    My second question is almost the same: shortly and soon?

    1. The boss will be with you shortly.
    2. The boss will be with you soon.

    Thank for reply:)

  2. #2
    SlickVic9000's Avatar
    SlickVic9000 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: nearly

    (not a teacher)

    Both pairs are correct. There are no differences in meaning between them.

  3. #3
    billmcd is offline Key Member
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    Re: nearly

    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier_Nickelsen View Post
    Hi, Could somebody explain me difference between nearly and almost? I mean, which phrase is correct or if both are, what's the difference?

    1. Tom nearly lost his leg in the accident.
    2. Tom almost lost his leg in the accident.

    No difference between #'s 1 & 2.

    My second question is almost the same: shortly and soon?

    1. The boss will be with you shortly.
    2. The boss will be with you soon.

    "Shortly" suggests a brief period of time. Whereas "soon" is more indefinite and you would not usually hear/use the statement, for example, as a response to a caller on the phone.
    Thank for reply:)
    b.

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