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  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    1.Is this underlined true in America? I worked in Canadian companies before, but I rarely heard people called by their nicknames.
    2. Nicknames in Korea are usually for teasing someone, but this writing seems to say they are also for good uses like inimate relationship. So does the nuance of nicknames depend?

    rp62)One of the best examples of the preference for informality among Americans is their use of nicknames...Americans consider the use of their nicknames to be an indication of acceptance of close friendship. By speaking to each other on a first name or nickname basis, people feel that a relationship is more equal, more comfortable, and often more intimate. Even at work, employees may be addressed by their nicknames, so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name, then it is fairly certain that a problem of some kind is about to be discussed...
    Last edited by keannu; 16-Nov-2012 at 15:30.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    If a nickname or shortened name is generally used, then I would assume that the boss was using their full name for a specific purpose. It might not be that the employee is in trouble, it might just be that a higher-ranking boss is in attendance so the boss is trying to look professional by using full names.

    However, I can see how it can seem as if there is a problem because (in the UK, at least) that assumption works for the relationship between a child and its parents. Parents usually call their children by their first name, or a contraction of it, but when the child is in trouble, they might use the full name.

    Mum: Suzie, stop doing that.
    Suzie: But mum, I like it.
    Mum: Suzie, I said stop doing it.
    Suzie: No!
    Mum: Suzanne Louise Shepherd, stop doing that right now!!!

    The words and the tone of the last sentence will tell the child that her mum is serious and that she is about to be in real trouble if she doesn't stop.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    MartinEnglish is offline Member
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    Default Re: so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    I agree with emsr2d2 - but I think you might need to get clear what a nickname really is and what the writer was referring to. It's very common in English-speaking cultures for adults to have nicknames among their friends and family (this seems especially true to me, as a Brit, of American culture where people often seemed to be called "Chip" and the like!)
    But that is very different to childhood nicknames which are often cruel and unkind. There'd be a big difference between a boss calling an employee by a nickname such as "Robbo" and calling him by a nickname such as "fatty".

  4. #4
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    Default Re: so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    In addition, I'm really not sure how many bosses would even be happy calling their employees by a true nickname, rather than just a friendly contraction of their name.

    If an employee's real first name is Michael, he might be called Mike or Mikey or Mick or Mickey by his colleagues and his boss, but I doubt any of them will call him "Spudface" which might well be a nickname his family and friends use.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    In most cases in the US, if you want to be known as "Bubba" or "Skinny" your boss will oblige.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    In most cases in the US, if you want to be known as "Bubba" or "Skinny" your boss will oblige.
    I like to be known as 'Gorgeous'. I wonder how an American employer would handle that.

  7. #7
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    That would conflict with sexual harassment speech codes.

  8. #8
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Default Re: so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I like to be known as 'Gorgeous'.
    You should be so lucky.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    I chose my avatar because it looks vaguely like me. I rest my case (and my weary limbs).

  10. #10
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default Re: so if a boss uses a staff member's formal name

    I didn't care too much about this issue until many teachers responded to this thread. Considering emsr2ds's last response, I think probably the writer confused "short names" like "Mike", "Bill", or "Steve" with "nicknames" like "Spudface", "Bubba", or "Skinny".

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