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  1. #1
    swety is offline Newbie
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    Default You might have told me.

    I heared that from my friend, ' you might have told me'
    Could i say this 'you must have told me' ?
    What is the difference?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: You might have told me.

    Quote Originally Posted by swety View Post
    I heared that from my friend, ' you might have told me'
    Could i say this 'you must have told me' ?
    What is the difference?
    "You might have told me" means "You could have told me" in the sense of "You should have told me". It's more polite than "You should have told me".
    It means, "It would have been better if you had told me".

  3. #3
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    Default Re: You might have told me.

    In the right context, "You might have told me" can also mean, "It is possible that you told me".

    "You must have told me" means "It is logically certain that you told me".
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  4. #4
    swety is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: You might have told me.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    In the right context, "You might have told me" can also mean, "It is possible that you told me".

    "You must have told me" means "It is logically certain that you told me".
    It means for the present situation i could say ''you might have told me'' . Like if someone is asking do you know about that and my answer would be '' I think you might have told me''??

  5. #5
    swety is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: You might have told me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "You might have told me" means "You could have told me" in the sense of "You should have told me". It's more polite than "You should have told me".
    It means, "It would have been better if you had told me".
    SO , we are taking it in the past context. Right? Like somethng happened and i would say '' you might have told me'' (you should have told me, you could have told me)

  6. #6
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: You might have told me.

    Quote Originally Posted by swety View Post
    SO , we are taking it in the past context. Right? Like somethng happened and i would say '' you might have told me'' (you should have told me, you could have told me)
    Yes.

    A: Hurry up, the meeting is starting.
    B: But the meeting isn't for another hour.
    A: No, it's been changed for 10 o'clock.
    B: You might have told me!
    (It would have been nice if you had told me that; I would have preferred that you told me about that before now; Why didn't you tell me before ...)

    5jj is correct about there being two meanings. This is one of them.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: You might have told me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    5jj is correct about there being two meanings. This is one of them.
    This is the other:

    A: DidI am sure I told you about George's accident.
    B: You might have told me. I don't remember.

    (I am getting very forgetful.)
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  8. #8
    swety is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: You might have told me.

    Thank you so much for explaining to me. I really appreciated.

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