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  1. #1
    apink is offline Newbie
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    Default Question on the Usage of 'as of'

    Hello,

    Sentences below are from The Sniper by Liam O’Flaherty

    The long June twilight faded into night. Dublin lay enveloped in darkness but for the dim light of the moon that shone through fleecy clouds, casting a pale light as of approaching dawn over the streets and the dark waters of the Liffey.

    the question is that I can't understand why the author used 'the as of' in that context.

    It may be one of the most hard things to be understood to non-native English speakers

    because it doesn't seems that we can explain how it is used in there by grammar.

    I have already asked a professional translator about that.

    he told me that 'even I don't know why the writer put the proposition phase in there so I just

    paraphrased it as 'like'.

    yes, I agree to that translation. and if it is translated as 'like', no problem to understand

    the context.

    but I would like to know his intention, what he really wanted to express with 'as of', not like or just 'as'.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Question on the Usage of 'as of'

    Sometimes questions like your can only be answered by the author of the passage.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    Gillnetter is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Question on the Usage of 'as of'

    The form used here has been in the language since at least the 11th century. As to why this author chose these words is something that the author would have to explain. I doubt that the author spent much time pondering over the exact words. You are, as we would say, looking at the text under a microscope and questioning each word. The author merely wrote the text, saw that it made sense, and moved on.

  4. #4
    TheParser is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Question on the Usage of 'as of'

    Quote Originally Posted by apink View Post







    but I would like to know his intention, what he really wanted to express with 'as of'
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,


    Thank you for sharing that beautiful sentence with us.

    1. I do not have the answer.

    2. I was just wondering whether it could be a case of ellipsis. (As you know, native speakers -- and writers -- often leave out words: If possible, call me.= If [it is] possible, call me.

    3. Remember: I am NOT claiming that this is the answer. I am just wondering.

    a. Do you think it would make sense to interpret that sentence something like this:

    Dublin lay enveloped in darkness but for the dim light of the moon that shone through fleecy clouds,

    casting over the streets and the dark waters of the Liffey a pale light as if the pale light were of approaching

    dawn."

    *****

    I found some examples in the "books" section of Google. The underlined words are my idea. I am not saying that I am right. I am just wondering.

    a. In certain [developing] countries, it is said, full obituaries of the great Sherlock [Holmes] were published as if the obituaries were of a real man.

    (As if: Modern Enchantment (2012) by Michael Saler. Mr. Saler quotes from an editorial in London's famous Times newspaper when the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes "died.")

    b. To be as solicitous for the salvation of the souls of the poor as to be solicitous for the salvation of the rich.

    (Exposition of the Old and New Testament (1828) by Matthew Henry and J.B. Williams.)

    c. All combinations which had duplicity for their origins were as much against the interests of Great Britain as they were against the interests of humanity.

    (The New Annual Register (1800) Andrew Kippis and Willliam Godwin.)


    James

  5. #5
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Question on the Usage of 'as of'

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,


    Thank you for sharing that beautiful sentence with us.

    1. I do not have the answer.

    2. I was just wondering whether it could be a case of ellipsis. (As you know, native speakers -- and writers -- often leave out words: If possible, call me.= If [it is] possible, call me.

    3. Remember: I am NOT claiming that this is the answer. I am just wondering.

    a. Do you think it would make sense to interpret that sentence something like this:

    Dublin lay enveloped in darkness but for the dim light of the moon that shone through fleecy clouds,

    casting over the streets and the dark waters of the Liffey a pale light as if the pale light were of approaching

    dawn."

    *****

    I found some examples in the "books" section of Google. The underlined words are my idea. I am not saying that I am right. I am just wondering.

    a. In certain [developing] countries, it is said, full obituaries of the great Sherlock [Holmes] were published as if the obituaries were of a real man.

    (As if: Modern Enchantment (2012) by Michael Saler. Mr. Saler quotes from an editorial in London's famous Times newspaper when the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes "died.")

    b. To be as solicitous for the salvation of the souls of the poor as to be solicitous for the salvation of the rich.

    (Exposition of the Old and New Testament (1828) by Matthew Henry and J.B. Williams.)

    c. All combinations which had duplicity for their origins were as much against the interests of Great Britain as they were against the interests of humanity.

    (The New Annual Register (1800) Andrew Kippis and Willliam Godwin.)


    James
    Liam O'Flaherty Liam O'Flaherty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia is one of my favourite writers, I can recommend his writing to anyone that doesn't know his work. I think he was one of the few writers that really mastered the short story.

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