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  1. #1
    Hugo_Lin is offline Junior Member
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    Default Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    Hi, native speaker friends:

    According to the grammar I learned, verbs should be modified by adverbs, right? But I've noticed native speakers prefer to use adjectives, and it seems to be so mainstream.

    For instance:
    Hire me. I work cheap.

    Eat healthy.

    He's real good.

    She works real hard.

    I can't think of other examples for the time being.

    Can you tell me if the above-listed sentences are acceptable?? Thanks!

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    The first sounds sub-standard. In the third, the adjective following a link verb is correct. In the fourth, 'hard' is an adverb.

    That leaves only the third. This is the sort of snappy suggestion in which a breach of the rules of grammar is forgiven because of the crisp effect. There is also the point that 'eat healthily' somehow sems to suggests that there is some healthy way of chewing and swallowing, which is not what 'eat healthy' means.

  3. #3
    Hugo_Lin is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    The first sounds sub-standard. In the third, the adjective following a link verb is correct. In the fourth, 'hard' is an adverb.

    That leaves only the third. This is the sort of snappy suggestion in which a breach of the rules of grammar is forgiven because of the crisp effect. There is also the point that 'eat healthily' somehow sems to suggests that there is some healthy way of chewing and swallowing, which is not what 'eat healthy' means.
    Thanks for the detailed explanation, Mr. 5jj.

    But the key word in the 3rd and 4th is "real". I think it should be:
    He's really good.

    She works really hard.

    Both modifies the following adjective( "good" and "hard.")

    I've also heard people say:"He's doing terrible." Is that also the sort of "crisp effect" supposed to be forgiven?

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo_Lin View Post
    But the key word in the 3rd and 4th is "real". I think it should be:
    He's really good.

    She works really hard.
    Sorry. I missed that. I agree that, in BrE, it should be 'really'.
    I've also heard people say:"He's doing terrible." Is that also the sort of "crisp effect" supposed to be forgiven?
    No. The fact is that the adjective/adverb difference is not one which is absorbed as readily, for example, the present/past difference. Adverbs are something that some childen encounter for the first time when they go to school, and some never master them.

    You will therefore hear adjectivesat times when you would expect adverbs. You will not generally hear this from better educated people, and you will not often see it in print.
    Last edited by 5jj; 18-Nov-2012 at 10:08. Reason: typo

  5. #5
    Hugo_Lin is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Sorry. I missed that. I agree that, in BrE, it should be 'really'.
    ...You will therefore hear adjectives at times when you would expect adverbs. You will not generally hear this from better educated people, and you will not often see it in print.
    Thanks, Mr. 5jj.

    Then are they acceptable in AmE?
    He's real good.
    She works real hard.
    He's doing terrible.

    Btw, I also heard the "He's doing terrible" from an American.

  6. #6
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo_Lin View Post
    Then are they acceptable in AmE?
    I'll have to leave the response to that to a speaker of AmE.

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo_Lin View Post
    Thanks, Mr. 5jj.

    Then are they acceptable in AmE?
    He's real good.
    She works real hard.
    He's doing terrible.

    Btw, I also heard the "He's doing terrible" from an American.
    If you hear "really + adjective" in BrE, there is a good chance that the AmE equivalent is "real + adjective", yes, but an AmE speaker will be able to confirm whether that is always the case.

    For info, please don't refer to other users here as "Mr". This is partly due to the fact that many of us are female so "Mr" would be inappropriate, but also because there is no need for such use. Just use the username. Thank you.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  8. #8
    Hugo_Lin is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If you hear "really + adjective" in BrE, there is a good chance that the AmE equivalent is "real + adjective", yes, but an AmE speaker will be able to confirm whether that is always the case.

    For info, please don't refer to other users here as "Mr". This is partly due to the fact that many of us are female so "Mr" would be inappropriate, but also because there is no need for such use. Just use the username. Thank you.
    OK. Will bear that in mind. :)

    And thanks for the answer. emsr2d2.:)

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    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    This very morning, on BBC's 'Match of the Day', Harry Redknapp, a native English speaker from East London, said 'He done excellent'.

    Students need to be aware that this sort of non-standard English is very common, but should not be copied.

    If Mr Redknapp – a multi-millionaire – knows it's incorrect grammar, he doesn't care. He's paid for his football knowledge, not his use of English.

    Rover

  10. #10
    Hugo_Lin is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Native speakers like to use adjectives instead of adverbs??

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    This very morning, on BBC's 'Match of the Day', Harry Redknapp, a native English speaker from East London, said 'He done excellent'.

    Students need to be aware that this sort of non-standard English is very common, but should not be copied.

    If Mr Redknapp – a multi-millionaire – knows it's incorrect grammar, he doesn't care. He's paid for his football knowledge, not his use of English.

    Rover
    Very true but it's very hard for us to tell. Most people follow whatever native speakers said.

    I've heard Americans say: "I done inviting him" or "I done doing something" for more than once. (btw, "for more than once" or "more than once"? "for" or not?)

    Plus, speaking of sub-standard or incorrect English, I've noticed there're still unwritten rules governing what native speakers say. They might do it subconsciously, but however incorrect they might be, there're rules. I can feel it. Non-native speakers don't follow any rules. There's a difference.

    Same thing applies to Chinese language.

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