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  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default rhythm through rhymes

    1. Through this nursery rhyme, she is trying to explain there's some rhythm in English, but I can't understand if "little" and "blue" have any rhyme in common, also in "come" and "horn", "will" and "wake", etc as marked in the video. The pairs don't seem to have any syllable in common, so what are the pairs for?
    2. In the video, she explains each line is one rhyme. Does "rhyme" mean a line or a syllable or pronunciation in common?

    video : Lesson 3b - Rhythm through Rhymes - English Pronunciation - YouTube

    Little
    Boy Blue,
    Come blow your horn,
    The sheep's in the meadow,
    The cow's in the corn;
    But where is the boy
    Who looks after the sheep?
    He's under a haycock,
    Fast asleep.
    Will you wake him?
    No, not I,
    For if I do,
    He's sure to cry

  2. #2
    jorgebessa's Avatar
    jorgebessa is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: rhythm through rhymes

    As far as I can see, the pairs are: horn / corn; sheep / asleep.
    Not only for the sound of these words, but also for the position in the structure of the poem.




    and
    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1. Through this nursery rhyme, she is trying to explain there's some rhythm in English, but I can't understand if "little" and "blue" have any rhyme in common, also in "come" and "horn", "will" and "wake", etc as marked in the video. The pairs don't seem to have any syllable in common, so what are the pairs for?
    2. In the video, she explains each line is one rhyme. Does "rhyme" mean a line or a syllable or pronunciation in common?

    video :

    Little
    Boy Blue,
    Come blow your horn,
    The sheep's in the meadow,
    The cow's in the corn;
    But where is the boy
    Who looks after the sheep?
    He's under a haycock,
    Fast asleep.
    Will you wake him?
    No, not I,
    For if I do,
    He's sure to cry

  3. #3
    SlickVic9000's Avatar
    SlickVic9000 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rhythm through rhymes

    (Not a Teacher)

    I'd look at it in four line sets. You'll then notice that the 2nd and 4th lines of each set rhyme, while the 1st and 3rd do not. This pattern repeats three times, giving the poem a distinct rhythm.

  4. #4
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default Re: rhythm through rhymes

    You mean "come/horn" and "cow/corn" rhyme? What about in the next four line set? I find nothing...So I don't know what lesson she is trying to give.

    Little
    Boy Blue,
    Come blow your horn,
    The sheep's in the meadow,
    The cow's in the corn;

    But where is the boy
    Who looks after the sheep?
    He's under a haycock,
    Fast asleep.

  5. #5
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: rhythm through rhymes

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    You mean "come/horn" and "cow/corn" rhyme? What about in the next four line set? I find nothing...So I don't know what lesson she is trying to give.
    Perhaps you had better check 'rhyme' in a dictionary before this thread goes any further. jorgebessa has already given a couple of example of rhymes in the text.

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: rhythm through rhymes

    She's talking about rhythm, not rhyme. Rhyme is at the end of a line, but she's looking at the rhythm and stress patterns. Horn and corn rhyme, but the words marked with dots are the stressed ones that give the rhythm to the piece. We call things like this nursery rhymes, so when she talks about the rhyme, she means the whole thing.

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