Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Mar 2012
    • Posts: 250
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    A monster has got only three hairs

    "Hair" is an uncountable noun.
    Do I get it right that when we physically see several separate hairs and we can count them, we can say "hairs"?
    For example:
    "There are two hairs in my soup"

    If I want to describe a monster in a picture and it has got only three visible hairs on its head is it possible to say:
    "The monster has got only three hairs"
    Last edited by angelene001; 20-Nov-2012 at 22:43.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 24,990
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: A monster has got only three hairs

    As long as you can physically count the individual hairs, then you can use the word "hairs" as a plural noun. However, if you are talking about a picture you are looking at, then you would say either "The monster has only three hairs" or "In the picture, there is a monster which has only three hairs". If you say "A monster has only three hairs" then you are making a general statement making it sounds as if all monsters have only three hairs.

    Note the correct spelling of "separate".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Mar 2012
    • Posts: 250
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: A monster has got only three hairs

    Thank you :)
    I've corrected the mistakes you pointed out.

    I've got one more question connected with describing a picture.
    If I'm writing about differences between two pictures, which one is correct:
    1. In picture A a woman is dancing. In picture B a woman is singing.
    or
    2. In picture A the woman is dancing. In picture B the woman is singing.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 24,990
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: A monster has got only three hairs

    Quote Originally Posted by angelene001 View Post
    Thank you :)
    I've corrected the mistakes you pointed out.

    I've got one more question connected with describing a picture.
    If I'm writing about differences between two pictures, which one is correct:
    1. In picture A a woman is dancing. In picture B a woman is singing.
    or
    2. In picture A the woman is dancing. In picture B the woman is singing.
    If the two pictures are of the same woman doing two different activities, then I would use "the" for both. If there is a different woman in each picture, I would use "a".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] hair or hairs?
    By Nathan Mckane in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 29-Feb-2012, 12:25
  2. dye and hairs
    By Ju in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-Mar-2011, 17:18
  3. [Grammar] hair/hairs
    By Will17 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Jun-2010, 12:09
  4. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-May-2009, 12:14
  5. [Grammar] hair or hairs
    By moniza in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2008, 18:13

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •