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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    'To buy oneself an a***-kicking'?

    Hi,
    Would this idiom mean, sarcastically, something like, 'you've put yourself in trouble!'?

    How about, 'I think I've bought myself an ar*e-kicking'?!


    (The above idiom was said to a man got caught red handed with the guy's wife in some hotel room.)
    Last edited by 5jj; 24-Nov-2012 at 23:01. Reason: Mrs Grundy rules

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 'To buy oneself an arse-kicking'?

    I'm not sure it's even sarcastic. It's just a way of saying that he has done something himself which is likely to end up with his being beaten up.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'To buy oneself an arse-kicking'?

    Thanks a lot. I just thought it might mean, 'you've dug your own grave!' or something like that. Best wishes!

  4. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 'To buy oneself an arse-kicking'?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'm not sure it's even sarcastic. It's just a way of saying that he has done something himself which is likely to end up with his being beaten up.
    I was wondering if you could also kindly answer this question. In your answer, would it be wrong to say, '...to end up with him being beaten up'? (To me, my sentence means, '...with him in a sitution where he'll be beaten up'. Thanks.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 'To buy oneself an arse-kicking'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    In your answer, would it be wrong to say, '...to end up with him being beaten up'?
    No. Both 'him' and 'his' are possible.

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