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    #1

    transmit vs. launch & send off

    1- Is transmit synonymous with launch & send off? If so, are these collocations correct? to transmit a shuttle/missile
    to send off or to send a shuttle

    2- which one is a synonym for "the important part"?
    a. staple b. elements
    when we say "she talked about the elements of geography" does the elements mean the important part? If so, are both a & b synonyms for "the important part"?

    3- Is astronaut synonymous with spacewalker? what's the difference between these two? Moreover, is the following sentence correct?
    The astronauts took five spacewalks to fix the optics of the space telescope. I think spacewalks should be changed into spacewalkers? am I correct?

    4- Is await synonymous with anticipate, look forward to, and see before?

    Thanks a lot in advance

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    #2

    re: transmit vs. launch & send off

    It is better to ask each question is a separate thread. I will address the first question. "transmit" can mean to send, but is usually used for information - "He transmitted an urgent message", "I can transmit this letter for you". One would not usually use "transmit" to mean the launching of a missile.

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    #3

    Unhappy synonym

    1- Is transmit synonymous with launch & send off? If so, are these collocations correct? to transmit a shuttle/missile
    to send off or to send a shuttle

    2- which one is a synonym for "the important part"?
    a. staple b. elements
    when we say "she talked about the elements of geography" does the elements mean the important part? If so, are both a & b synonyms for "the important part"?

    3- Is astronaut synonymous with spacewalker?

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    #4

    re: transmit vs. launch & send off

    1. No. You transmit messages. You launch missles.
    2. Neither
    3. No

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    #5

    re: transmit vs. launch & send off

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    It is better to ask each question is a separate thread. I will address the first question. "transmit" can mean to send, but is usually used for information - "He transmitted an urgent message", "I can transmit this letter for you". One would not usually use "transmit" to mean the launching of a missile.
    thanks, but as u said "One would not usually use "transmit" to mean the launching of a missile". It means that one can also use transmit a shuttle but it may not happen usually. for exAMPLE: often I play football on fridays. often does not happen at the beggining of a sentence usually. am I right?

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    #6

    re: transmit vs. launch & send off

    I would say more than we usually don't use "transmit" for a rocket. I cannot think of an instance where "transmitting" a shuttle/rocket/spacecraft would be correct or natural.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #7

    collocations

    are these collocations correct?

    transmit a shuttle/rocket/spacecraft

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    #8

    Unhappy transmit vs. launch & send off

    hi, I have not got a good answer for my question yet. I'd be thankful of those teachers who make this question clear for me:

    One would not usually use "transmit" to mean the launching of a missile. It means that one can also use transmit a shuttle but it may not happen usually. for example in the following sentence: "often I play football on fridays". often does not happen at the beggining of a sentence usually. But it is also correct to bring usually at the beggining of a sentence. am I right?
    therefore, send off and transmit can be used instead of launch. yes or no?

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    #9

    Re: transmit vs. launch & send off

    We do not use 'transmit' when we mean 'launch'.
    It is possible to use 'send off', though that has a wider meaning than 'launch'.

    The simplest thing, if you want to talk about the launching of a rocket, is to use the word 'launch'.

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    #10

    Re: transmit vs. launch & send off

    You seem determined to use "transmit" -- so determined that you posted the question at least four times. I have merged all your threads together.

    I will add my voice to the four native speakers who have already told you this - do not use "transmit" with a rocket.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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