Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Relative Clause

  1. #1
    grammarfreak is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Dominican Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Dominican Republic
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like

    Exclamation Relative Clause

    I want to know which of these sentences are grammatically the corrects :

    1) You're the one who does that kind of thing, or
    You're the one who do that kind of thing.

    2) You're the only one who does it, or
    You're the only one who do it.

    3) You are the man who does this work properly, or
    You are the man who do this work properly.

    4) You're the only one who believes that it is true, or
    You're the only one who believes that is true
    .................................................. ...........................................

    Please can anyone explain the correct use of (yet), because I am a little confused about it in some sentences that I saw ?
    Last edited by grammarfreak; 06-Dec-2012 at 16:08. Reason: grammar error

  2. #2
    Hedwig's Avatar
    Hedwig is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Argentina
      • Current Location:
      • Argentina
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    518
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Relative Clause

    Does, does, does, believes.

    It would be more orderly if you started a different thread for your question about 'yet', since it's an entirely different issue. I suggest that you provide some examples regarding your doubts.

    -not a teacher-

  3. #3
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,170
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Relative Clause

    [QUOTE=grammarfreak;779907]I want to know which of these sentences are grammatically the corrects :

    1) You're the one who does that kind of thing, or
    You're the one who do that kind of thing.

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Maybe you are confused between:

    (a) You are the one who does that kind of thing.

    (b) You are one of those who do that kind of thing.

    YOU ARE THE ONE WHO DOES THAT KIND OF THING

    You are the one (person).

    What person?

    The person who does that kind of thing. ("Does" agrees with "who," which refers to the

    singular word "person.")

    YOU ARE ONE OF THOSE WHO DO THAT KIND OF THING

    You are one of those people.

    What people?

    The people who do that kind of thing. ("Do" agrees with "who," which refers to the

    plural word "people.")

  4. #4
    Hedwig's Avatar
    Hedwig is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Argentina
      • Current Location:
      • Argentina
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    518
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Relative Clause

    Excellent explanation, Parser. This way of reasoning things out is most helpful for non-natives. It's very practical and avoids meddling with grammatical names and labels.

  5. #5
    grammarfreak is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Dominican Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Dominican Republic
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Relative Clause

    Thank you Hedwig :

    In regards to '' yet '' is about its usage as conjuntion, I know how to use it as adverb ( in contrast with already ), for example :

    The best is yet to come ( like this )

    In regards to '' do '' and '' does '' I already known that is a matter of subject/verb agreement.

    Any assistance that you or other members can give me regarding the use of '' yet '' as conjuntion, will be appreciated and pleased.

    Sincerely,

    Grammarfreak

  6. #6
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,170
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Relative Clause

    Quote Originally Posted by grammarfreak View Post



    Any assistance that you or other members can give me regarding the use of '' yet '' as conjuntion, will be appreciated and pleased.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,



    I am delighted to present some information that I have found.

    1. "Yet acts as a coordinating conjunction meaning 'but' [in] 'Ralph acts the part of a buffoon, yet I enjoy his antics.' "

    Source: Morton S. Freeman, A Treasury for Word Lovers (copyright 1983).

    2. "Yet is ... a coordinating conjunction roughly equivalent to but: His speech was almost unintelligible, yet I found that I enjoyed it."

    Source: Wilma and David R. Ebbitt, Perrin's Index to English (copyright 1939 ... 1977).

    3. "[T]he conjunct yet ... has a very similar force to but in: He tried hard, yet he failed."

    [Also] "He tried hard, but yet he failed."

    [My comments. If I am wrong, you can be sure that someone will correct me. By "conjunct," that book seems to mean what we call an "adverb," but it has connecting force. In other words, the "real" conjunction is "but." But nowadays, most books accept "yet" as a conjunction. So I believe that we can say:

    I try to be accurate, yet I often make mistakes.
    I try to be accurate, but yet I often make mistakes.
    I try to be accurate, and yet I often make mistakes.

    In the first sentence, most books would probably call "yet" a coordinating conjunction; that book, however, calls it a conjunct. That is, an adverb that can stand on its own for connecting purposes.]

    And "that book" is A Concise Grammar of Contemporary English (1973) by Professors Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, page 254.


    James

    P.S. One of my favorite (and older) books will NOT accept "yet" as a conjunction. It says that "yet" is a so-called "transitional adverb" such as "therefore," "hence," "nevertheless," etc. So I think that it wants "yet" to be written like this: "I try to be accurate; yet, I make many mistakes." This "older" book is Descriptive English Grammar by House and Harman (copyright 1931 and 1950), page 425. Since it is almost 2013, I guess that we can just call "yet" a coordinating conjunction.
    Last edited by TheParser; 07-Dec-2012 at 12:10. Reason: Forgot to mention authors' names

Similar Threads

  1. Relative clause
    By ibra121 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-Mar-2011, 22:10
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Apr-2010, 15:13
  3. [Grammar] relative clause(past participle clause )
    By nono1994 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Jan-2010, 11:23
  4. relative clause
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Dec-2007, 19:04
  5. relative clause
    By hela in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-Jun-2004, 01:15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •