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  1. #1
    sky3120's Avatar
    sky3120 is offline Member
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    Default "There are no plans to build new offices."

    "There are no plans to build new offices."

    The meaning of plans here is intention or arrangement?


    According to Oxford, it means arrangement in the sentence.

    "The government has announced plans to create one million new training places."

    According to my dictionary, it means intention in the sentence.

    "There are no plans to build new offices."


    I think that it also should mean arrangement or depending on context, either one is possible?


    How do you native English speakers figure out what it means? Thank you so much as usual and have a good weekend.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "There are no plans to build new offices."

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post
    "There are no plans to build new offices."

    The meaning of plans here is intention or arrangement?


    According to Oxford, it means arrangement in the sentence.

    "The government has announced plans to create one million new training places."

    According to my dictionary, it means intention in the sentence.

    "There are no plans to build new offices."


    I think that it also should mean arrangement or depending on context, either one is possible?


    How do you native English speakers figure out what it means? Thank you so much as usual and have a good weekend.
    "There are no plans/is no plan to build." = "There is no intention/arrangement to build."

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