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Thread: Just as well

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    #1

    Just as well

    Dear teachers :

    I am an advanced english estudent interesting in grammar, I have good knowledge of the use of as well and as well as, but I have a great confusion in using just as well and its meaning.

    1) Please, I need a good and convincing explanation of its meaning.

    2) I also need to know when I have to use it and its grammar rule.

    3) What word or phrase I can use to replace just as well in a sentence.

    4) I would like those who give explanations about this topic, please write some examples and sentences as well.


    I would appreciate your assistance in this matter.

    Sincerely,

    Grammarfreak
    Last edited by grammarfreak; 10-Jan-2013 at 20:21. Reason: misspelling and add something else

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    #2

    Re: Just as well

    Quote Originally Posted by grammarfreak View Post
    Dear teachers :

    I am an advanced english estudent and interesting in grammar, I have good knowlodge of the use of as well and as well as, but I have a great confusion in unsing just as well and its meaning.

    1) Please, I need a good and convincing explanation of its meaning. How "convincing" must it be for you?

    2) I also need to know when I have to use it and its grammar rule. I don't know if there is any particular "grammar rule".

    3) I would like those who give explanations about this topic, please write some examples and sentences as well.

    Examples: (A) "Grammarfreak failed his driver test today". (B) "Oh yeah? It's just as well , because I think he needs more practice". (i.e. I'm not surprised/I agree)
    (A) "What's wrong with you today?" (B) "I don't know. I've made so many mistakes. I might just as well have stayed home today." (i.e. instead of coming to work, I should have stayed home)

    I would appreciate your assistance in this matter.

    Sincerely,

    Grammarfreak
    b.

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    #3

    Re: Just as well

    Thank you Billmcd for your explanation, but I would like to know which word or phrase I can use to replace just as well in your examples.

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    #4

    Re: Just as well

    Quote Originally Posted by grammarfreak View Post



    2) I also need to know when I have to use it and its grammar rule.

    3) What word or phrase I can use to replace just as well in a sentence.


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****



    Good morning, Grammarfreak:



    You asked me in another thread to comment on this thread. I am delighted to do so.

    1. Billmcd has already given us an excellent answer.

    2. I have found some more information that may help you. I know that it certainly helped me.

    3. Four famous grammarians whose book * is used by teachers throughout the world say this:

    a. may/might (just) as well is an idiomatic expression.

    (i) The word "just" is in parentheses because you can omit it and the meaning will still be almost the same.

    b. The four scholars give this example: "You might (just) as well tell the truth."

    (i) They say that the complete sentence (which we usually do NOT say) is something like:

    "You might (just) as well tell the truth as to continue to tell lies.

    (ii) These four scholars also say that the "force" (meaning) of the sentence could be expressed like this:

    "There is no point in your continuing to tell lies."

    4. I also found something in another book ** that may interest you.

    a. "It was just as well I didn't know at the time."

    (i) That book says that it means something like: It was a good thing that I didn't know at the time.

    *****


    Thanks for asking this question. I really learned a lot.


    HAVE A NICE DAY!


    James


    References: * Professors Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech, and Svartvik, A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (1985) , page 224.

    ** The New Oxford American Dictionary (2001), page 923.

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    #5

    Re: Just as well

    Thanks a lot James :

    Now I just understood the use of that idiomatic expression and the examples that Billmcd gave me, I was trying to see the book A comprehensive Grammar of the English Language online to no avail, but as soon as I can afford, I will buy it, I think is the one I need for my grammar studies.

    James I would also like to see your threads, you are good at giving explanations.

    Hoping to keep in touch with you.

    Sincerely,

    Grammarfreak
    Last edited by grammarfreak; 05-Dec-2012 at 22:59. Reason: pleonasm

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