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  1. #1
    Marina Gaidar's Avatar
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    Default A black horseman looms from the gloomy thickets

    It is correct to say "A black horseman looms from the gloomy thickets" or "A black horseman looms out of the gloomy thickets".

  2. #2
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    Default Re: A black horseman looms from the gloomy thickets

    Quote Originally Posted by Marina Gaidar View Post
    It is correct to say "A black horseman looms from the gloomy thickets" or "A black horseman looms out of the gloomy thickets".
    I would use "out of". I would be careful with using "A black horseman" - are you talking about the colour of his skin?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    Default Re: A black horseman looms from the gloomy thickets

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would use "out of". I would be careful with using "A black horseman" - are you talking about the colour of his skin?
    Oh, no actually About the colour of his clothes and of his horse. Racism is not a very common topic for CIS countries, so I haven't taken this into account. Is it really so confusing? How can I express it differently?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: A black horseman looms from the gloomy thickets

    Quote Originally Posted by Marina Gaidar View Post
    Oh, no actually About the colour of his clothes and of his horse. Racism is not a very common topic for CIS countries, so I haven't taken this into account. Is it really so confusing? How can I express it differently?
    A horseman dressed all in black and mounted on a jet black steed ...
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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